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Caribbean

World Spice and Lisa Dupar Team Up for Seattle Children’s Hospital

Rastafari El Hanout rubbed Goat

Rastafari El Hanout rubbed Goat

My position at World Spice’s professional division has afforded me wonderful opportunities to connect with some of the best chefs around Seattle. One of the most rewarding parts of my role as a spice merchant actually happens when I’m off the clock and I get to experience the delicious dishes that our products enhance. From newcomers like Mamnoon to all the restaurants in the Tom Douglas empire, I never have trouble coming up with great restaurants for date night (deciding on which one is the hard part!) But until recently I had never had the chance to experience the cuisine of one of our most loyal and long standing chef clients, Lisa Dupar Catering.

Last weekend I was honored to attend one of the winemaker dinners as part of the Auction of Washington Wines fundraiser for Seattle Children’s Hospital. Chef Lisa Dupar and her talented crew teamed up with Dunham Cellars, Willie Green’s, and World Spice for a fabulous “Farmers AT the Table” dinner. Hosted by the gracious and generous Midori Chan and Paul Strisower, this event gave guests the chance to meet some of the people behind the food being served, while giving purveyors like us an opportunity to enjoy the magic that Lisa Dupar creates with our ingredients.

Chef Lisa Dupar and Robert Russell

Chef Lisa Dupar and Robert Russell

When Lisa first approached us about participating in this dinner we were ecstatic; after getting a sneak peak at the menu, I knew we’d have to do something extra special for the guests who came out to support the Seattle Children’s Hospital. One of the services we offer both our retail customers and professional clients is custom spice blend production, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity for a limited edition spice blend. I was immediately drawn to the goat on the menu and knew I wanted to create a rub for it that was either Persian inspired or with some Caribbean flair. After playing with a few different mixes, it struck me, why not do both? After a few hours of tinkering and a few delicious taste tests, I settled on the playfully named Rastafari el Hanout. By taking the well-known middle eastern spice blend, Ras el Hanout, and adding a few traditional Caribbean ingredients, I believe I created the perfect goat rub.

Unfortunately space in our little shop is extremely limited, so we can’t offer every custom blend we make; only those in attendance at Riverside Falls last weekend got to taste the exact recipe for this particular limited edition blend. That doesn’t mean we can’t create something special just for you! If you have a big event coming up and want to offer your guests something extra special, ask us about creating the perfect custom blend for you.

The evening soiree at Riverside Falls was an unforgettable night, and I’d like to wrap up by thanking Lisa Dupar (check out her wonderful cookbook), Jeff Miller from Willie Green’s, Eric Dunham, the indulgently hospitable Midori Chan and Paul Strisower, and of course all the guests who came out to support such a great cause.

Categories: Caribbean, Global Cuisines, Hot Topics, Middle East, Notes from the Field, Spice Notes | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Smoky BBQ Pork

Pork shoulder is one of the most inexpensive cuts of meat, and you can find it almost anywhere. The lean meat is punctuated with ribbons of fat, which self-bastes the pork as it cooks slow and oh-so-low. While the meat is fabulously tender, it doesn’t boast much inherent flavor, which is where our Smoky BBQ Rub comes in. This spice blend, combined with beer, forms a marinade that infuses a wonderful smoked flavor deep in to the roast- you won’t believe it came from the oven. Banana leaves are a nod to traditional Mexican carnitas, effectively steaming the meat as it cooks slowly, holding in the moisture, while imparting some of their own nutty, grassy flavor. They can be purchased in many Latin and Asian markets- sometimes fresh, but often frozen, which works just as well.

Smoky BBQ

 

Smoky BBQ Pork

Ingredients

3 pounds pork shoulder
1 tablespoon Smoky BBQ Rub
1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
1/2 cup light beer
2 teaspoons Mexican oregano
1 white onion, chopped
4 large banana leaves

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. In a bowl large enough to hold the pork, whisk together Smoky BBQ, garlic, beer and Mexican oregano.
  3. Place the pork in the bowl with the spice marinade and massage into the pork.
  4. Add diced onion and mix well.
  5. Marinate for three to six hours.
  6. Holding both ends of a banana leaf, slowly drag leaf over a burner on moderately high heat until the leaf slightly changes color and become shiny.
  7. Turn leaf over and toast other side in the same fashion.
  8. Repeat process with remaining leaves.
  9. Line roasting pan with 3 of the toasted banana leaves, shiny side down. Let excess hang over sides allowing enough excess to cover pork.
  10. Transfer pork mixture to banana-lined pan and fold overhang f leaves over pork to enclose completely. Use 4th leaf if needed.
  11. Roast for 4-5 hours, or until pork is tender and can be easily shredded with a fork.
  12. Allow pork to cool slightly, and shred into just larger than bite-sized pieces with two forks, and spread out on a cookie sheet.
  13. Turn your broiler on high, and adjust the oven rack to the upper 1/3 of the oven.
  14. Broil the shreds of pork for just a few minutes, until the fat sizzles and the edges of the shreds become golden and crisp.
  15. Serve as filling for tacos, alongside beans and rice or with classic American BBQ fare
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/smoky-bbq-pork/

Categories: BBQ, Caribbean, Latin America, Main Meals, North America, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ancho Chili Beef Empanadas

Who doesn’t love food that you can hold in your hand?  The beauty of empanadas is that the rich, buttery dough can be filled with almost anything - sweet or savory. Our Ancho Chili Powder is mild-medium in heat and adds magnificent depth to the beef and vegetable filling we chose. Ancho chiles have a wonderful, darkly sweet flavor, so we added a little Alderwood Smoked Salt for just a touch of smoky contrast. They can be served either hot or at room temperature; we like ours with salsa,  sour cream and a Hibiscus Margarita.  They freeze well, so make a bunch and plan to enjoy them another day, or surprise yourself at how quickly your guests devour the extras.

Ancho Chili Beef Empanadas

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Ancho Chili Beef Empanadas

Yield: 24 empanadas

Ingredients

For the Dough
4 1/2 cups flour
1 cup unsalted butter, cut into cubes and chilled
2 large eggs
2/3 cup ice water
2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
For the Filling
1/4 cup olive oil
5 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 large sweet onion, finely chopped
1 medium red bell pepper, finely chopped
1 pound lean ground beef
1 1/2 teaspoons Alderwood Smoked Salt
3 tablespoons Ancho Chili Powder, ground
1 teaspoon Mexican Oregano
1/2 cup sliced black olives
For the Egg Wash
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon water

Instructions

    To Make The Dough
  1. Sift flour into a large bowl. Add salt and chilled, cubed butter. Using your fingertips or a pastry cutter, mix together until the mixture resembles coarse meal.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat together eggs, chilled water and vinegar and add to flour mixture.Combine until well incorporated.
  3. Empty onto a lightly floured surface and knead just enough to bring the dough together. Cut dough in half and form each half into a rectangle. Chill for at least 1 hour.
  4. To Make the Filling
  5. In a heavy skillet heat olive oil over medium heat.
  6. Add onions, red bell peppers and garlic and saute until softened. Add Alderwood Smoked Salt, Ancho Chili Powder and Mexican Oregano, and saute for about 1 minute.
  7. Add ground beef, breaking up any lumps and cook until no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Add olives and mix well. Taste for seasoning, adjust as needed. Pour into a bowl and refrigerate until chilled.
  8. To Assemble the Empanadas
  9. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  10. Remove chilled dough from the refrigerator. Cut each rectangle into 12 pieces. Form into discs and cover with a towel.
  11. On a lightly floured surface, take one of the pieces and roll it out into a circle (about 1/8 inch thick). Holding the circle in the palm of your hand, place 2 heaping teaspoons of the chilled filling in the center.
  12. Fold the two edges of the circle together over the filling. Press the edges to seal. Using a fork dipped in flour, crimp the edges so the filling won't escape.
  13. Transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet. Repeat the process with the remaining dough and filling. Lightly brush the empanadas with egg wash.
  14. Bake until golden, about 25 minutes. They are done if they sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.
  15. Transfer to a wire rack and cool for at least 5 minutes.
  16. Serve with salsa and sour cream.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/ancho-chili-powder-beef-empanadas/

Categories: Caribbean, Latin America, Main Meals, Recipes, Snacky Bits | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

A word of advice from a novice gardener: Carrots are much bigger than carrot seeds. Somehow, fifty-odd square feet of garden space doesn’t seem like that much when it’s being planted, but it can produce a surprising haul, most especially in the carrot department. Praise be that carrots are delicious, so their being excessively plentiful is a problem I’m thankful to have! This soup is hearty and delicious, made velvety by the soft puree of carrots, and from the toasted rice in the Poudre de Colombo curry. We’ve dressed it up a little with the prawns, but this soup can easily be made vegan by omitting them, and using red miso paste in favor of the Worcestershire powder.  If you’re short on time, or you perhaps planned your garden space better than I did, and therefore the creative utilization of carrots is not a pressing issue for you, a can of pumpkin puree is an excellent substitution.

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Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

Ingredients

Olive oil, for sautéing
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1.5 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
1.5 # carrots, peeled and chopped
3 cups chicken, vegetable, or homemade seafood stock if you're so lucky
3/4 cups mild, dry white wine
1 California Bay Leaf
1/4 cup Poudre De Colombo Curry, ground
Sel de Mer or Murray River Flake salt
1 can coconut milk
1 tablespoon Worcestershire Powder
Juice of 1 lime, plus wedges from 1 more for serving
Pinch of brown or raw sugar
Freshly picked cilantro leaves for garnish
12 prawns
1 Tablespoon Hungarian Paprika
1 Teaspoon Indian Cayenne

Instructions

  1. Heat oil, and sauté onions, garlic, ginger, and carrots for five minutes
  2. Deglaze with wine, and reduce until pan is nearly dry
  3. Add stock, bay leaf, and 1 tablespoon of the curry, cover, and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 15 minutes.
  4. Remove bay leaf. In a food processer or blender, puree soup until smooth. Work in small batches for best- and safest- results, adding in the coconut milk to aid in the blending.
  5. Strain the processed soup through a wire mesh strainer in to a clean pot, and return the mixture to the stove over low heat.
  6. Add the remaining coconut milk, Worcestershire powder, sugar, and curry, 1 tablespoon at a time, until desired seasoning level is reached.
  7. Add lime juice, and adjust for salt.
  8. Rub prawns with paprika and cayenne, and grill or sear them.
  9. Ladle soup in to bowls, and garnish each with two prawns, a wedge of lime, and a few leaves of cilantro.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/poudre-de-colombo-carrot-soup/

Categories: Caribbean, Curries & Masalas, Fruits of the Sea, Main Meals, North America, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Caribbean Spice Grilled Salsa

Fresh pineapple tastes of a wild summer, its tropical sweetness tempered by raucous acidity. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to find a ripe one and some folks can be overwhelmed by the tartness. My favorite way to tame pineapple is to cook it slowly until the pale yellow becomes a rich gold and the sugars take center stage, as in this grilled salsa. Make sure to place your pineapple slices away from the hottest parts of the grill; caramelized pineapple requires time (20-30 minutes) and indirect heat. Our Caribbean Spice, with the richness of allspice berries, is the perfect blend for this salsa. A bit of extra cumin adds an intense savory note that’s perfect for grilling. While I broke everything down in a food processor for the smoother texture and ease of preparation, fans of chunky salsa can chop everything together by hand. The smoky flavor from the grill counterpoints the sweetness of the pineapple and tomato perfectly, leaving you with a well balanced and delicious side for tortilla or plantain chips, chicken, and fish.

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Caribbean Spice Grilled Salsa

Ingredients

1 lb. ripe pineapple, peeled, sliced and cored (you can also use ripe mango or papaya, too)
1 medium red onion, peeled and sliced thick
4 roma tomatoes, halved
5 cloves garlic, peeled
2 oz. ginger, peeled and sliced (about a 2-3 inch piece)
1/2 large orange, juiced
2 lemons, juiced
1 lime, juiced
1/3 cup cilantro, chopped
2 Tbl. Caribbean Spice, ground
1-1/2 tsp. Cumin, ground
1 tsp. honey
(optional) 2 Tbl. beer, rum or tequila

Instructions

  1. Lightly oil the pineapple, tomato and onion, so that they won't stick to the hot grill (or grill pan). Place on the grill and cook on both sides, until almost done. (You mostly want to get good grill marks on them - that's flavor! You can also grill your citrus, too. It will make them easier to juice, and give you a little more flavor, but you might want to let them cool before you juice them.) After you take them off the grill, cut them into smaller pieces for the food processor.
  2. In a food processor, add the garlic and ginger and process. (This will just break them down a little bit.) Now put in the rest of the ingredients the food processor and puree. Taste for seasoning - you might want to add more salt, lime juice or Caribbean Spice, depending on your taste. Depending on how sweet your fruit is, you might want to add more honey, too.
  3. This is a great topping for grilled meats or fish, but is also just as good with chips.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/caribbean-spice-grilled-salsa/

Categories: BBQ, Caribbean, Fruits of the Sea, Global Cuisines, Latin America, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jerk Chicken

Summer means grilling, and we at World Spice think there is nothing quite like the smell of Jerk Chicken cooking on the grill!  Whether you use our Jerk Rub in a marinade or just sprinkled (liberally!) on the chicken, the aroma as it grills will have your stomach growling and your mouth watering….

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Jerk Chicken

Ingredients

2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 garlic cloves, crushed
3 lemons (or limes), juiced
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 cup (about 2 oz.) Jerk Rub, ground
1 tablespoon Utah Basin Salt
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3 lbs. chicken

Instructions

  1. Put the chicken, cut up or whole, into a large, heavy-duty gallon Ziploc bag. Mix together the remaining ingredients in a bowl and pour over the chicken, then seal the bag. Make sure that all of the chicken is coated in the marinade. Refrigerate overnight. Grill over indirect heat until the juices run clear when you poke the chicken with a sharp knife.
  2. If you forgot to marinate the chicken overnight, but just can't wait to eat some grilled Jerk Chicken, you can use the Jerk Rub as a dry rub. Sprinkle about 1/2 cup of Jerk Rub over both sides of the chicken. Now lightly sprinkle salt on both sides of the chicken. Grill...and enjoy!
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/jerk-chicken/

Categories: BBQ, Caribbean, Recipes | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment