browser icon
You are using an insecure version of your web browser. Please update your browser!
Using an outdated browser makes your computer unsafe. For a safer, faster, more enjoyable user experience, please update your browser today or try a newer browser.

Tagged With: beer

Get Your Sausage-Making on with Chorizo Bomb!

Chorizo is great on the grill!

Chorizo is great on the grill!

World Spice Merchant‘s new Chorizo Bomb spice blend  has been a favorite of our restaurant clients for years, so it was no surprise that it started flying off the shelves as soon as we started offering it to our retail family. This versatile blend can be used to make a Mexican-style chorizo, or even a North African –style merguez sausage — as links or patties. It pulls double, triple, and quadruple duty as a great grill seasoning, taco and fajita spice, or in simple beans and rice. A little smoky from the Pasilla Oaxacas, sweet smoked paprika, and Chipotle flakes, a little herbaceous from the generous dose of oregano, thyme, and marjoram, and a bit sweet from the Hungarian paprika — you’ll see, there’s a reason we call it the “bomb!”

So, how do you use it? We’re testing additional recipes right now, but in the meantime, here are easy patty-making recipes for both Mexican chorizo and North African mergeuz sausage. For additional inspiration, check out HuffpostTaste’s published list of the “The Best Recipes that Use Chorizo.”

P.S. If you decide to go all D.I.Y. homemade, here’s a great article explaining how to grind your own meat for patties as well as case up your sausage links: how to make your own sausage.

Mexican-style Chorizo Sausage

Ingredients

2 pounds ground pork or turkey
4 tablespoons Chorizo Bomb
1-1/2 teaspoons Alderwood Smoked Salt
6 cloves garlic, smashed
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
3/4 cup water or beer

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, break apart your ground meat into manageable chunks.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Add the blended ingredients to the ground meat and mix by hand.
  4. When thoroughly mixed, you will want to check to see if it's seasoned to your taste. To do so, take a little bit of the chorizo, flatten it out, then cook it in a small frying pan over medium heat until it's completely cooked through. Taste it to see if it has enough salt or seasoning. If not, then add either more salt or more Chorizo Bomb.
  5. If you like the seasoning, then you can go ahead and cook the remaining chorizo mixture or store it. The raw mixture will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days, but also freezes well. You can portion it into patties for breakfast and/or for burgers, or just use it in recipes.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/mexican-style-chorizonorth-african-merguez/
North African Merguez Sausage

Ingredients

2 pounds ground lamb or beef
1/3 cup chopped roasted red pepper
1/2 cup parsley, chopped
4 tablespoons Chorizo Bomb
1-1/2 teaspoons Alderwood Smoked Salt
6 cloves garlic, smashed
1/2 cup red wine

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, break apart the ground meat into manageable pieces.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Add the blended ingredients to the ground meat and mix well. When thoroughly mixed, you will want to check to see if it's seasoned to your taste. To do so, take a little bit of the mergeuz, flatten it out, then cook it in a small frying pan over medium heat until it's completely cooked through. Taste it to see if it has enough salt or seasoning. If not, then add either more salt or more Chorizo Bomb.
  4. If you like the seasoning, then you can go ahead and cook the remaining merguez mixture or store it. This will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days, but also freezes well. You can portion it into patties for breakfast and/or for burgers, or just use it in recipes.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/mexican-style-chorizonorth-african-merguez/

Categories: Africa, Global Cuisines, Grilling Season, Hot Topics, Latin America, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Harlot’s Harvest Pumpkin Ale

Harlot's Harvest Pumpkin Ale

.

As we all mourn the end of summer (say it ain’t so!) it’s easy to forget all the great things that fall has to offer: apple season, football season, sending those kids back to school, acorn squash, and of course pumpkins! There are a plethora of things one can do with a nice pumpkin, but one of my personal favorites is to brew beer. These days my first indication that fall is right around the corner is getting that call from our friends over at Pike Brewing looking for some spices for their seasonal pumpkin ale. A few weeks later, nothing softens the blow of the shorter days and cooler nights like getting a taste of the first batch. It seems like breweries are everywhere today, and as the seasons change the shelves are just packed with options for pumpkin beer, some far better than others. I have to say that this is hands down one of the very best I’ve tasted, and having a lovely lady at home who adores pumpkin beer, I’ve tasted almost every one we can find. This makes me especially proud to say that I had a hand in helping our Pike Place neighbors with such a great product.

Anyone who has brewed a spiced beer can tell you being able to filter out the spices is a crucial step in the process, and anyone who has tried to get nutmeg to a roughly “cracked” state can tell you it’s not real easy. After lots of experimenting, research, and trial-and-error, we finally came to the conclusion that the simplest method of cracking nutmeg is the most effective, using a good old-fashioned hammer. We even keep a specially designated (and sanitized!) hammer around our warehouse for just this occasion, and this time I seem to have gotten caught on camera.

Cracking Nutmeg

.

I could describe the Pike Brewing Harlot’s Harvest, but I couldn’t do nearly as good a job as their official press release. So as I wrap this up, I notice that it’s already five minutes past closing time on a Friday and time to open a Harlot’s Harvest for myself, since blogging is such thirsty work! So this weekend, if you’re putting in a tough shift on your own blog, or tailgating down at the Clink (go Hawks!), or however you choose to enjoy these last lingering days of summer, check out this great pumpkin offering from our friends at Pike Brewing.

Categories: Hot Topics, Notes from the Field | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Bar-H Beef Rub Marinade

Chock full of lemon and chile, Bar-H Beef Rub was made for summer grilled steaks. The only thing that could make it better is, of course, beer! We marinated this glorious tomahawk-cut steak overnight, then grilled it over red hot coals for a crispy exterior and a juicy, medium-rare interior. The Newcastle brown ale we used brought a nutty component, perfectly offsetting the tangy spice of the rub itself. Topped with a thick slice of a compound butter also made with Bar-H Beef Rub, this steak is the definition of decadent, but still oh-so rugged. We can still smell it sizzling on the grill…

 

Bar H Beef Rub marinade and compound butter!

 

Bar-H Beef Rub Marinade

Ingredients

1 big, beautiful steak, your favorite cut
1 Tbl. Bar-H Beef Rub, ground
1/2 cup beer (any good beer will do)
2 Tbl. olive oil
1 clove garlic, crushed

Instructions

  1. Put the the steak into a large zip-lock bag (or a shallow air-tight container). Mix the rest of the ingredients together and pour over steak. Seal bag (or container tightly). Refrigerate for 2 hrs or overnight.
  2. Bring steak to room temperature before grilling or broiling. (A room temperature steak cooks better and more evenly than a cold one.) Top with a thick slice of an herb and spiced flavored butter, letting it melt slowly over the steak.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/bar-h-beef-rub/

Categories: BBQ, North America, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment