Search Results for: prawns

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Delicious Food Rut of Summer 2013

Hello, my name is Holly, and I am an addict. I have ordered Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns too many times to count in the past five weeks.

And, why not? This dish is the perfect, delicious embodiment of late summer. The corn has the delicate smoky sweet that only grilled corn can have, the prawns are consistently succulent, and the slightly sweet fennel salad is the perfect juxtapositon to the mild heat of the creamy chile sauce. It’s an addiction for sure, but one that I don’t want to quit.

Like many professionals, Chef Cody of Lecosho doesn’t work from a recipe but instead uses intuition and knowledge to guide him to the perfect dish, seasoning as he goes. When asked for a recipe, he happily described the process and the how-tos, but had no exact measurements to share. So, for those that prefer precise measurements, this recipe’s a challenge — but a challenge well worth undertaking! Go on, try it out, and test your cooking chops. If you decide to just go to Lecosho and order the prawns off the menu, I highly recommend ending your evening with the cardamom olive oil cake served with macerated Rainier cherries and almond gelato. You can’t go wrong with that!

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Shuck fresh corn, char grill, then chill. Once chilled, remove from cob, set aside.
  2. Sautee Fresno chiles with garlic and shallot. Once aromatic, add corn back in, seasoning with Murray River flake salt and freshly ground Tellicherry black pepper.
  3. Add just enough heavy cream to cover. Simmer over medium-high heat until the cream has reduced, and the corn has absorbed most of the liquid.
  4. To make the house roasted tomato oil, roast fresh roma tomatoes with fresh thyme, sliced garlic, salt, Tellicherry black peppercorn, and just a pinch of Indian cayenne.
  5. Roast for about 45 minutes at 350.
  6. Puree in a high speed blender with Pomace oil until smooth.
  7. Toss prawns in tomato oil, and grill over high heat very quickly--about 45 seconds each side.
  8. Dress grilled prawns with a little more tomato oil.
  9. Shave fennel bulb a thin as possible - with a very sharp knife or on a mandoline.
  10. Toss with orange supremes and a little extra virgin olive oil.
  11. Season with a little salt and Tellicherry black peppercorn.
  12. Prepare the bowl with a little tomato oil in the bottom, and add a spoonful of creamed corn. Top with prawns, garnish with fennel salad and a fennel frond, and dust with Murray River Flake Salt.
  13. Enjoy!

Notes

For those unfamiliar, the pomace oil that Chef Cody calls for is oil that has been extracted from olive pulp after the first mechanical press with the use of solvents - a technique more common to the production of canola or safflower oils.

It's a more cost-effective oil (though it still retains good olive flavor), so many chefs use it in place of extra-virgin during the cooking process. It's a good ingredient to have on hand, but if you do not, you can dilute your precious extra-virgin olive oil in equal parts with canola oil.

https://www.silkroaddiary.com/lecoshos-chargrilled-prawns/

Categories: Course, Fruits of the Sea, Global Cuisines, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

World Spice at Home

Amanda_Julie_Portrait
Who says you have to make curry with curry? Not us!

When my friend and mentor Julie Kramis Hearne approached me to co-author World Spice at Home, I was thrilled to accept. Julie’s book vision was compelling, and it perfectly matched our mission at World Spice.

Using spices in everyday cooking with confidence, creativity and ease is what this book is all about. We’ve all experienced the lure of an exotic spice blend and wondered how to use it, and World Spice at Home provides the answer.  Julie and I selected our favorite spice blends and set out to show just how easily you can use each one, and in so many different ways! Creating World Spice at Home has been an amazing collaboration- with one recipe idea sparking another, and more often than not there is something new for dinner.

World Spice at Home

Perhaps the hardest task in creating World Spice at Home was narrowing down the list of spice blends to include in the book- and why we couldn’t settle for a nice round number like twelve. It really needed to be thirteen….

Baharat
Baharat– a Middle Eastern exotic can be used on a grilled rib-eye or spiced nuts.

BerbereBerbere– an Ethiopian signature spice blend can be used in chili and on brisket.

BesarBesar– an Emerti blend, at home on pork chops and in gingerbread cake

Chinese Five SpiceChinese Five Spice in sweets, like shortbread and apple pie.

Kashmiri CurryKashmiri Curry makes a great dressing for grilled vegetables

Poudre de ColomboPoudre de Colombo adds fabulous flavor to skillet prawns.

Tikka MasalaTikka Masala is classic on baked chicken.

DukkahDukkah from Egypt adds flavor and texture to goat cheese and flatbread

HarissaHarissa is a Moroccan classic that elevates the flavor of a simple roast chicken.

Kashmiri Garam MasalaKashmiri Garam Masala is a match made in heaven on anything chocolate.

Ras el HanoutRas el Hanout is the secret ingredient for everything from pork chops to kale tabbouleh.

zaatar_israeli_2Israeli Za’atar for corn chowder and french fries!

Syrian Za'atarSyrian Za’atar on rack of lamb or salmon.

World Spice at Home is the perfect book to help you decide what to do with any spice blend and you will find yourself visiting the spice cabinet much more often. From our kitchens to yours- Enjoy!

 

Categories: Cookbook Club, Global Cuisines, Hot Topics, Notes from the Field, Recipes, Tools of the Trade | 2 Comments

Besar Shrimp Skewers

To celebrate the last gasp of summer, and the upcoming release of World Spice at Home, enjoy another sneak peek from the book!

The combination of exotic spices on seafood served with pineapple will transport you straight to the tropics. The bright layers of citrus and spice blend perfectly into the coconut oil and onto the shrimp. If you don’t have time to skewer, just add the shrimp and pineapple to your indoor grill pan and serve on a platter with toothpicks. You can also turn this into a main dish by serving with steamed or grilled vegetables and rice.

Besar Shrimp

Besar Shrimp Skewers

Besar Shrimp Skewers

Ingredients

    For the marinade:
  • ¼ cup coconut or extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons ground Besar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon Hungarian paprika
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • For the shrimp:
  • 24 extra-large or large shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
  • 12 (6-inch) bamboo skewers
  • 1 ripe pineapple
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing
  • 2 teaspoons thyme, for garnish
  • Flavor Notes:
  • Either Tikka Masala or Kashmiri Curry can be substituted for the besar to make this recipe with different flavors, or try orange juice and zest in place of the lemon. Add ½ teaspoon turmeric to the marinade if you want the prawns to have a brighter yellow color.

Instructions

  1. To make the marinade, melt the coconut oil in a small pan and allow it to cool to room temperature. In a large bowl, combine the lemon juice, garlic, Besar, lemon zest, paprika, and salt, and whisk well. Slowly add the oil whisking to combine. Add the shrimp and gently toss to coat. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
  2. Meanwhile, soak the skewers in water, placing a small plate directly on top of them to keep them completely submerged. Soak for about 20 minutes.
  3. Cut the top and bottom off the pineapple and remove the rind. Halve the pineapple; cut one half into small wedges or 3- to 4-inch cubes. Cut the other half into larger wedges or half rings for serving.
  4. Remove the skewers from the water. Thread a shrimp onto a skewer through the tail, then through the top. Push the shrimp down toward the bottom, leaving enough room to grasp the skewer. Add a pineapple cube and then another shrimp. Place the skewer on a baking sheet. Repeat with the rest of the shrimp and pineapple. Add any extra pineapple to the skewers. Brush the pineapple cubes with a little olive oil.
  5. Heat an outdoor grill or indoor grill pan to medium-high heat. Cook the skewers for 3 to 4 minutes per side. Brush them with any extra marinade. Transfer to a platter, sprinkle with thyme, and serve with the pineapple wedges.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/besar-shrimp-skewers/
*(c)2014 By Amanda Bevill and Julie Kramis Hearne. All rights reserved. Excerpted from World Spice at Home: New Flavors for 75 Favorite Dishes by permission of Sasquatch Books.

Categories: Caribbean, Course, Global Cuisines, Grilling Season, Hot Topics, Middle East, Recipes, Snacky Bits | Leave a comment

Chef Andrea’s Cardamom and Olive Oil Cake

Recently, Holly admitted her powerlessness over the char grilled prawns at the West Edge’s favorite eatery, Lecosho. She recommended following the dish with this fantastic cardamom olive oil cake for dessert, and my ears perked right up.

Exotic spices to feature in this fabulous cake- cardamom, pink peppercorn, and fennel seed.

Now as a Sicilian, when you say “olive oil,” I say “more!” So I called over to beg pastry chef Andrea for her recipe and she graciously gave it up. The Ranier cherries that she serves with it are at the end of their season now, but don’t let that stop you from attempting this cake! Try a few slices of Northwest pear, poached in wine and sugar, or a few cubes of caramelized pumpkin, roasted until soft to garnish. This cake is heavenly with freshly ground cardamom, but is also a brilliant vehicle to feature any number of exotic spices- try pink peppercornssaffronfennel (or fennel pollen!) or anise seed, paired with a different flavors of gelato.

A word on the recipe itself: “Real deal” bakers and pastry chefs weigh their ingredients, much like we weigh our spices here in the shop. Weighing provides far more consistent and accurate measurements, which is why we choose to sell our spices that way, too. I left Chef Andrea’s original weights in the recipe in case you’re in possession of a gram scale, but also translated them to the more commonly used volume measurements for the average home cook, too.

Cardamom Olive Oil Cake with Rose-Poached Pears and Pistachio Gelato

 

Chef Andrea’s Cardamom Olive Oil Cake

Chef Andrea’s Cardamom Olive Oil Cake

Ingredients

  • 290 grams all-purpose flour (2 1/3 cups)
  • 6 grams baking powder (1 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 4 grams Utah Basin salt (1 scant teaspoon)
  • 2 eggs
  • 316 grams sugar (1.5 cups plus 1 tablespoon)
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups olive oil- pomace, or a mild-tasting extra virgin
  • Freshly ground cardamom seed, to taste (~2 tablespoons, for us)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 F if you've got a convection oven, 350 F for standard.
  2. Line a half sheet tray (for the home cook, a full-sized jelly roll pan) with parchment paper, and grease it liberally with olive oil or non-stick spray.
  3. Cream sugar and eggs to ribbon stage.
  4. Sift together the dry ingredients, and set them aside.
  5. Combine the olive oil and milk (they won’t incorporate, but this is okay).
  6. With a stiff rubber spatula, add the dry ingredients and milk/olive oil mix to the creamed sugar and egg mix in alternating thirds- that is, 1/3 of the dry ingredients, mix, 1/3 of the milk/oil, mix, repeat until all ingredients are just incorporated.
  7. Add your desired amount of freshly ground cardamom.
  8. Pour into the prepared pan, and spread until even.
  9. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the edges are golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. If you're not using a convection oven, turn the cake pan halfway through baking.
  10. Allow the cake to cool on a wire rack.
  11. To serve as they do at Lecosho, top with a scoop of almond gelato (Chef Andrea makes her own, but we love Procopio!) and pile of pitted local Rainer cherries, mascerated in just a bit of sugar. Enjoy!
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/chef-andreas-cardamom-olive-oil-cake/

Categories: Course, Holiday, Recipes, Sweet Somethings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

A word of advice from a novice gardener: Carrots are much bigger than carrot seeds. Somehow, fifty-odd square feet of garden space doesn’t seem like that much when it’s being planted, but it can produce a surprising haul, most especially in the carrot department. Praise be that carrots are delicious, so their being excessively plentiful is a problem I’m thankful to have! This soup is hearty and delicious, made velvety by the soft puree of carrots, and from the toasted rice in the Poudre de Colombo curry. We’ve dressed it up a little with the prawns, but this soup can easily be made vegan by omitting them and using red miso paste in favor of the Worcestershire powder.

 

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Heat oil, and sauté onions, garlic, ginger, and carrots for five minutes. Deglaze with wine, and reduce until pan is nearly dry
  2. Add stock, bay leaf, and 1 tablespoon of the curry, cover, and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 15 minutes.
  3. Remove bay leaf. In a food processer or blender, puree soup until smooth. Work in small batches for best results, adding in the coconut milk to aid in the blending. Strain the processed soup through a wire mesh strainer in to a clean pot, and return the mixture to the stove over low heat.
  4. Add the remaining coconut milk, Worcestershire powder, sugar, and curry, 1 tablespoon at a time, until desired seasoning level is reached. Add lime juice, and adjust for salt.
  5. Rub prawns with paprika and cayenne, and grill or sear them.
  6. Ladle soup in to bowls, and garnish each with two prawns, a wedge of lime, and a few leaves of cilantro.

Notes

If you're short on time, or you perhaps planned your garden space better than I did, and therefore the creative utilization of carrots is not a pressing issue for you, a can of pumpkin puree is an excellent substitution.

https://www.silkroaddiary.com/poudre-de-colombo-carrot-soup/

Categories: Caribbean, Course, Curries & Masalas, Fruits of the Sea, Global Cuisines, Main Meals, North America, Recipes, Soups and Stews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment