Author Archives: Holly

World Spice Holiday Gift Guide

Peace.

Give the gift of spices and continue to share the simple joy of flavor with friends and family long after the decorations come down.

 

Make Your Own Curry giftset with a shiny Masala Dabba

Make Your Own Curry giftset &  Masala Dabba

FOR THE CULINARY ADVENTURER-

 

Primal Pork and Beef Towels and Corresponding giftsets

Primal Pork and Beef Towels and Corresponding giftsets

FOR THE MEATLOVER  –

Shake: A New Perspective on Cocktails

Shake: A New Perspective on Cocktails

FOR THE COOK THAT HAS EVERYTHING–
Brown Betty, Black Tea, and Tea Strainer

Brown Betty, Black Tea, and Tea Strainer

FOR THE TEA AFICIONADO – 

 

FOR THE COUNTRY HOME KITCHEN-

Saffron, Piment d'Espelette, Fennel Pollen & Truffle Salt

Saffron, Piment d’Espelette, Fennel Pollen & Truffle Salt

STOCKING STUFFERS AND HOSTESS GIFTS-

Still stuck? Check out our Gift Cards, Gift Cards, and more Gift Cards!

Categories: Holiday, Hot Topics | Leave a comment

Heavenly Hawaij Soup

Soup shots are the perfect starter for a long holiday feast, and this Heavenly Hawaij Soup is the ideal choice. Combining aromatic spices, earthy mushrooms and velvety cream, it is as decadent as holiday fare should be. If you start with this, what could be next? Cardamom, turmeric and saffron are the essential spice elements of the  Yemenese blend Hawaij, and they play wonderfully in this exotic mushroom soup. It’s a leftover that will have you sneaking back to the kitchen at four am.

Heavenly Hawaij Soup

Heavenly Hawaij Soup

Heavenly Hawaij Soup

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 5 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 small sweet onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 ounce (about 1 cup) dried porcinis, broken into smaller pieces
  • 2 pounds chopped crimini mushrooms
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 tablespoons ground Hawaij
  • 1-1/2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  1. In a Dutch oven, melt the butter on medium heat. Saute the garlic and onions until slightly browned. Add the flour, and mix well (it will be thick).
  2. Add in the porcinis, criminis, stock, wine and Hawaij. Mix well. Bring to a boil, then turn down the heat to medium low, and let simmer for about 20 minutes.
  3. Working in batches, puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth. Once the soup is pureed, return it to the pot and add the heavy cream.
  4. Simmer for about 10 minutes, to reduce the cream a bit. Add the juice of 1/2 of a lemon, then taste for salt and add what you need. If you feel the soup is too thick, add more stock. If you feel it needs to be thicker, continue to reduce it on low until it’s at the consistency you prefer.
  5. Serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/hawaij-cream-of-mushroom-soup/

Categories: Course, Global Cuisines, Holiday, Middle East, North America, Recipes, Sides, Soups and Stews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Advieh – Queen of Persian Cuisine

Advieh - Queen of Persian Cuisine

Persian and Iranian cuisines are some of the world’s most venerable, loved for centuries for the same reasons that Mediterranean and Indian cuisines are so popular in the western world today. Dishes effortlessly combine sweet and savory, with warm, toasted spices, nuts, and dried fruits alongside lamb and braised poultry.

Much as garam masala is essential to Indian cuisine, Advieh is essential to the cuisine of Persia and Iran. Our latest blend creation is a version of this key ingredient–  an exotic combination of multiple varietals of sweet cinnamon, cardamom seed, and roses, grounded by the earthiness of cumin and black peppercorn and finished with a bright pop of Indian coriander. We’ve already whipped up some delectable dishes with Advieh,  Persian-Spiced  Lamb Meatballs and these delicious Walnut Rosewater Wafers. Try one of those recipes or use it to season a roasted leg of lamb, traditional kebabs, or to perfume rice pilafs.

Categories: Hot Topics, Notes from the Field, Spice Notes | Tags: , , | 9 Comments

Walnut Rosewater Wafers

These sublime wafers are the perfect treat if you are looking for a sweet to satisfy without over-doing it. The lofty texture of these delicate wafers owes itself to the flourless dough, and the ethereal flavor comes from our new Advieh spice blend and its rosewater complement. Try them as a light dessert with cardamom coffee, with your afternoon tea or as an apertif.

The Advieh spice made this cookie recipe!

Walnut Rosewater Wafers

Walnut Rosewater Wafers

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups finely ground walnuts
  • ½ cup walnut pieces, for decoration
  • 4 egg yolks, divided 3/1
  • ¾ cup white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground Advieh
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon rosewater
  • 1 teaspoon water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Line a large sheet pan with parchment.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the ground walnuts, 3 egg yolks, sugar, Advieh, baking soda and rose water until well blended.
  4. Roll the dough into teaspoon sized balls and place 2” apart on the sheet pan. Don’t skimp on the spacing, these wafers need room to expand.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk the remaining egg yolk and water. Press a walnut piece into each cookie and brush with the egg yolk glaze.
  6. Bake for 20 minutes, or until golden.
  7. Allow the cookies cool on the sheet pan for about 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/walnut-rosewater-wafers/

Categories: Course, Global Cuisines, Holiday, Middle East, North America, Recipes, Sweet Somethings | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Get Your Sausage-Making on with Chorizo Bomb!

Chorizo is great on the grill!

World Spice Merchant’s new Chorizo Bomb spice blend  has been a favorite of our restaurant clients for years, so it was no surprise that it started flying off the shelves as soon as we started offering it to our retail family. This versatile blend can be used to make a Mexican-style chorizo, or even a North African-style merguez sausage, as links or patties. It pulls double, triple, and quadruple duty as a great grill seasoning, taco and fajita spice, or in simple beans and rice. A little smoky from the Pasilla Oaxacas, sweet smoked paprika, and Chipotle flakes, a little herbaceous from the generous dose of oregano, thyme, and marjoram, and a bit sweet from the Hungarian paprika… well, you’ll see. There’s a reason we call it the “bomb!”

So, how do you use it? We’re testing additional recipes right now, but in the meantime, here are easy patty-making recipes for both Mexican chorizo and North African mergeuz sausage. For additional inspiration, check out HuffpostTaste’s published list of the “The Best Recipes that Use Chorizo.”

P.S. If you decide to go all D.I.Y. homemade, here’s a great article explaining how to grind your own meat for patties as well as case up your sausage links: how to make your own sausage.

Mexican-style Chorizo Sausage

Mexican-style Chorizo Sausage

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ground pork or turkey
  • 4 tablespoons Chorizo Bomb
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons alderwood smoked salt
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water or beer

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, break apart your ground meat into manageable chunks.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ingredients and blend. Add the blended ingredients to the ground meat and mix by hand.
  3. When thoroughly mixed, you will want to check to see if it's seasoned to your taste. To do so, take a little bit of the chorizo, flatten it out, then cook it in a small frying pan over medium heat until it's completely cooked through. Taste it to see if it has enough salt or seasoning. If not, then add either more salt or more Chorizo Bomb.
  4. If you like the seasoning, then you can go ahead and cook the remaining chorizo mixture or store it. The raw mixture will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days, but also freezes well. You can portion it into patties for breakfast and/or for burgers, or just use it in recipes.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/mexican-style-chorizonorth-african-merguez/
North African Merguez Sausage

North African Merguez Sausage

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, break apart the ground meat into manageable pieces.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ingredients and blend. Add the blended ingredients to the ground meat and mix well.
  3. When thoroughly mixed, you will want to check to see if it's seasoned to your taste. To do so, take a little bit of the mergeuz, flatten it out, then cook it in a small frying pan over medium heat until it's completely cooked through. Taste it to see if it has enough salt or seasoning. If not, then add either more salt or more Chorizo Bomb.
  4. If you like the seasoning, then you can go ahead and cook the remaining merguez mixture or store it. This will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days, but also freezes well. You can portion it into patties for breakfast and/or for burgers, or just use it in recipes.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/mexican-style-chorizonorth-african-merguez/

Categories: Africa, Course, Global Cuisines, Grilling Season, Hot Topics, Latin America, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Delicious Food Rut of Summer 2013

Hello, my name is Holly, and I am an addict. I have ordered Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns too many times to count in the past five weeks.

And, why not? This dish is the perfect, delicious embodiment of late summer. The corn has the delicate smoky sweet that only grilled corn can have, the prawns are consistently succulent, and the slightly sweet fennel salad is the perfect juxtapositon to the mild heat of the creamy chile sauce. It’s an addiction for sure, but one that I don’t want to quit.

Like many professionals, Chef Cody of Lecosho doesn’t work from a recipe but instead uses intuition and knowledge to guide him to the perfect dish, seasoning as he goes. When asked for a recipe, he happily described the process and the how-tos, but had no exact measurements to share. So, for those that prefer precise measurements, this recipe’s a challenge — but a challenge well worth undertaking! Go on, try it out, and test your cooking chops. If you decide to just go to Lecosho and order the prawns off the menu, I highly recommend ending your evening with the cardamom olive oil cake served with macerated Rainier cherries and almond gelato. You can’t go wrong with that!

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Lecosho’s Chargrilled Prawns

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Shuck fresh corn, char grill, then chill. Once chilled, remove from cob, set aside.
  2. Sautee Fresno chiles with garlic and shallot. Once aromatic, add corn back in, seasoning with Murray River flake salt and freshly ground Tellicherry black pepper.
  3. Add just enough heavy cream to cover. Simmer over medium-high heat until the cream has reduced, and the corn has absorbed most of the liquid.
  4. To make the house roasted tomato oil, roast fresh roma tomatoes with fresh thyme, sliced garlic, salt, Tellicherry black peppercorn, and just a pinch of Indian cayenne.
  5. Roast for about 45 minutes at 350.
  6. Puree in a high speed blender with Pomace oil until smooth.
  7. Toss prawns in tomato oil, and grill over high heat very quickly--about 45 seconds each side.
  8. Dress grilled prawns with a little more tomato oil.
  9. Shave fennel bulb a thin as possible - with a very sharp knife or on a mandoline.
  10. Toss with orange supremes and a little extra virgin olive oil.
  11. Season with a little salt and Tellicherry black peppercorn.
  12. Prepare the bowl with a little tomato oil in the bottom, and add a spoonful of creamed corn. Top with prawns, garnish with fennel salad and a fennel frond, and dust with Murray River Flake Salt.
  13. Enjoy!

Notes

For those unfamiliar, the pomace oil that Chef Cody calls for is oil that has been extracted from olive pulp after the first mechanical press with the use of solvents - a technique more common to the production of canola or safflower oils.

It's a more cost-effective oil (though it still retains good olive flavor), so many chefs use it in place of extra-virgin during the cooking process. It's a good ingredient to have on hand, but if you do not, you can dilute your precious extra-virgin olive oil in equal parts with canola oil.

https://www.silkroaddiary.com/lecoshos-chargrilled-prawns/

Categories: Course, Fruits of the Sea, Global Cuisines, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , | Leave a comment