Notes from the Field

10 Spice Vegetable Soup with Cashew Cream

The timing is perfect! As spring beckons and we are craving healthier fare, what better way to welcome the weather than with this spice-centric soup from one of our new favorite cookbooks, The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out by Angela Liddon.

10-spice veg soup

“This is quite possibly the ultimate bowl of comfort food, made with a decadent, creamy broth and loaded with an array of health-boosting spices. It’s really hard to stop at one bowl! Be sure to soak the raw cashews in water the night before (or for at least three to four hours) so they are ready when you plan to make the soup.”

10 Spice Vegetable Soup with Cashew Cream

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup raw cashews, soaked
  • 6 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 sweet or yellow onion, diced
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 11/2 cups peeled and chopped sweet potato, regular potato, or butternut squash
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes, with their juices
  • 1 tablespoon 10-Spice Blend
  • Fine-grain sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 to 2 cups baby spinach or de-stemmed torn kale leaves (optional)
  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas or other beans, drained and rinsed (optional)

Instructions

  1. In a blender, combine the soaked and drained cashews with 1 cup of the vegetable broth and blend on the highest speed until smooth. Set aside.
  2. In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and onion and sauté for 3 to 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent.
  3. Add the carrots, bell pepper, potato, celery, diced tomatoes with their juices, remaining 5 cups broth, the cashew cream, and the 10-Spice Blend. Stir well to combine.
  4. Bring the mixture to a boil and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Season with salt and black pepper and add the bay leaves.
  5. Simmer the soup, uncovered, for at least 20 minutes, until the vegetables are tender. Season with salt and black pepper.
  6. During the last 5 minutes of cooking, stir in the spinach and beans, if desired. Remove and discard the bay leaves before serving.
  7. Tip: If you don’t have the ingredients on hand to make the 10-Spice Blend, feel free to use your favorite store-bought Cajun or Creole seasoning mix and add to taste.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/10-spice-vegetable-soup-with-cashew-cream/

Reprinted by arrangement with Avery, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © Angela Liddon, 2014.

If you are interested in exploring and tasting more recipes from Oh She Glows, pick up a copy in our store or online and join us for the World Spice Cookbook Club, coming up March 4th. RSVP to [email protected].

Categories: Cookbook Club, Healthy, Recipes, Soups and Stews | 2 Comments

Oh She Glows 10 Spice Blend

Many chefs have a go-to spice blend all their own and we are pleased to share this one from Angela Liddon, author of The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out. We fell in love with the book from page 1 and have chosen it as one of the World Spice Cookbook Club selections for 2015.

” This spice blend takes less than five minutes to throw together, and it can be used in a variety of dishes, from soups and stews to baked potatoes, kale chips, tofu, beans, avocado toast, and more.”

Oh She Glows 10 Spice Blend

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a medium jar. Secure the lid and shake to combine. Shake the jar before each use.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/oh-she-glows-10-spice-blend/

Reprinted by arrangement with Avery, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © Angela Liddon, 2014.

Categories: Cookbook Club, Healthy, Recipes, Spice Notes | 2 Comments

Cookbook Club 2015

For those of us who joined cookbook club last year – THANKS! – for making it such a huge success. 2015 is shaping up to be even bigger and better, with loads of new cookbooks to explore and an expanded summer series of social cookouts at our warehouse location. Here are the selections:

cookcook_selections_2015

February 4th: World Spice at Home: New Flavors for 75 Favorite Dishes by Amanda Bevill and Julie Kramis-Hearne

March 4th: The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out by Angela Liddon

April 1st: Fresh & Fermented: 85 Delicious Ways to Make Fermented Carrots, Kraut, and Kimchi Part of every Meal by Julie O’Brien & Richard J. Climenhage

May 6th: Afro Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean & Southern Flavors Remixed by Bryant Terry

June 3rdBrazilian Barbecue and Beyond by David Ponte, Jamie Barber, and Lizzy Barber

July 1st: Cocina Tropical: The Classic & Contemporary Flavors of Puerto Rico by Jose Santaella

August 5thAsian Dumplings: Mastering Gyoza, Springrolls, Samosas and More and The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy-Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches by Andrea Nguyen

September 2nd: At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well by Amy Chaplin

October 7th: 660 Curries by Raghavan Iyer

Membership in the club is free, and we “Meet & Eat” the first Wednesday of the month. Every member brings a dish prepared from the featured cookbook and we all gather to discuss the book, the food and whatever else comes to mind! Benefits include a 20% discount off cookbook club selections and a giveaway at each meeting.

Sign up in the store or email us at: [email protected]

 

Categories: Cookbook Club, Hot Topics, Notes from the Field, Tools of the Trade | Leave a comment

Pasilla Oaxaca Vegetable Soup

Sometimes it’s hard to get enough of a good thing, and that is certainly true with pasilla Oaxaca. Every summer we run out of the small crop of these rare chiles, and celebrate when they are harvested again in the fall. They come only from the Oaxaca region of southern Mexico and combine a rich dose of smoky chile flavor with just the right level of heat- not too much. We are thrilled, because this years crop just arrived!
Recipes

Pasilla Oaxaca are traditional in molé sauces, rellenos and salsas but are also SUPER easy to use whole if you want fabulous flavor in your next hearty fall soup. Just drop one in and remove before serving…like a bay leaf!

oaxaca_soup_2

Use pasilla Oaxaca in your favorite recipe for chili or vegetable soup, or try this creative Afro-Latin fusion. We’ve used both our Harissa spice blend, traditional in North Africa and the pasilla Oaxaca chile to season a chunky melange of carrots, zucchini, okra and black eyed peas in this satisfying fall soup. Enjoy!

Pasilla Oaxaca Vegetable Soup

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon avocado or vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon plus 1/2 teaspoon ground Harissa, divided
  • 2-3 carrots, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1- 28 oz. can diced tomatoes
  • 6 cups vegetable broth
  • 3/4 cup dried black eyed-peas, pre-soaked
  • 1 pasilla Oaxaca chile, whole
  • 2 medium zucchini, chopped
  • 1 cup sliced okra, fresh or frozen
  • 4 cups chopped kale

Instructions

  1. In a large soup pot over medium heat, sauté the onion, salt and 1 teaspoon Harissa in 1 tablespoon of oil until softened, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the carrots and continue cooking until they change color and begin to sweat, about 3 minutes more. Add the apple cider vinegar to deglaze the pan.
  3. Add the tomatoes, vegetable broth, black eyed peas and pasilla Oaxaca and bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes until the beans begin to soften.
  4. While the soup is simmering, in a separate pan, sauté the zucchini in the remaining 1 teaspoon of avocado oil with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of Harissa for 3-5 minutes until golden.
  5. Add the sauteed zucchini, okra and kale to the soup pot and simmer an additional 15 minutes. Remove the pasilla Oaxaca before serving.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/pasilla-de-oaxaca-vegetable-soup/

Chef tip! It is worth the extra effort to sauté the zucchini with some spices before boiling them in the soup pot. This allows the flavors to be fully absorbed by the zucchini, and creates a nice texture too.

zucchini_harissa

 

Categories: Africa, Latin America, Main Meals, Notes from the Field, Recipes, Soups and Stews | 2 Comments

World Spice at Home

Amanda_Julie_Portrait
Who says you have to make curry with curry? Not us!

When my friend and mentor Julie Kramis Hearne approached me to co-author World Spice at Home, I was thrilled to accept. Julie’s book vision was compelling, and perfectly matched our mission at World Spice.

Using spices in everyday cooking with confidence, creativity and ease is what this book is all about. We’ve all experienced the lure of an exotic spice blend and wondered how to use it, and World Spice at Home provides the answer.  Julie and I selected our favorite spice blends and set out to show just how easily you can use each one, and in so many different ways! Creating World Spice at Home has been an amazing collaboration- with one recipe idea sparking another, and more often than not there is something new for dinner.

World Spice at Home

Perhaps the hardest task in creating World Spice at Home was narrowing down the list of spice blends to include in the book- and why we couldn’t settle for a nice round number like twelve. It really needed to be thirteen….

Baharat
Baharat- a Middle Eastern exotic can be used on a grilled rib-eye or spiced nuts.

BerbereBerbere- an Ethiopian signature spice blend can be used in chili and on brisket.

BesarBesar- an Emerti blend, at home on pork chops and in gingerbread cake

Chinese Five SpiceChinese Five Spice in sweets, like shortbread and apple pie.

Kashmiri CurryKashmiri Curry makes a great dressing for grilled vegetables

Poudre de ColomboPoudre de Colombo adds fabulous flavor to skillet prawns.

Tikka MasalaTikka Masala is classic on baked chicken.

DukkahDukkah from Egypt adds flavor and texture to goat cheese and flatbread

HarissaHarissa is a Moroccan classic that elevates the flavor of a simple roast chicken.

Kashmiri Garam MasalaKashmiri Garam Masala is a match made in heaven on anything chocolate.

Ras el HanoutRas el Hanout is the secret ingredient for everything from pork chops to kale tabbouleh.

zaatar_israeli_2Israeli Za’atar for corn chowder and french fries!

Syrian Za'atarSyrian Za’atar on rack of lamb or salmon.

World Spice at Home is the perfect book to help you decide what to do with any spice blend and you will find yourself visiting the spice cabinet much more often. From our kitchens to yours- Enjoy!

 

Categories: Cookbook Club, Global Cuisines, Hot Topics, Notes from the Field, Recipes, Tools of the Trade | 2 Comments

Coriander Cures Spring Fever

European and Indian Coriander

At a time of year when the thought of cooking another winter squash is too much to bear, and the shoots of green aren’t quite tall enough for harvest yet (where IS that asparagus, anyway???), coriander is the cure. The light, mellow citrus flavors elevate the palate in anticipation of the season to come. Most commonly found as an essential layer of flavor in spice blends, from the exotic curries and masalas of India to the familiar pickling spices and crab boils found here in the States, it can shine even more brightly used alone or in simple combinations to bring light fresh flavor in any season.

Coriander has been cultivated since ancient times and infused into the cuisines of every continent. It comes in two varieties- commonly called Indian and European- because of where they are typically grown and used. Both have the same light flavor profile and singular ability to add both a savory base and citrus top notes with just one spice. The European variety is more brown in color and round in shape, whereas the Indian is greenish-yellow and oblong. Indian coriander is not as common on the American market. It can be more bold,  presenting stronger citrus top notes, and a creamy element not found in the European variety. They can be used interchangeably, and in combination.

Fresh Coriander Leaves = Cilantro!

The flavors of coriander are best preserved in the whole seeds, which can easily be ground right before use. It can be a little “husky” so you may want to sift the ground coriander before use if you grind it at home. Me? I like it rustic and don’t mind the crunch. Here are some recipes to bring coriander onto the table for breakfast, lunch or dinner and dessert- because that’s how we roll. There just isn’t enough room in the spice pantry for the ones you cant’s use in multiple recipes.

Crunchy Coriander Granola

Coriander Roasted Beets

Millet Coriander Carrot Cake

Last spice note on coriander? The seeds come from the same plant that gives us cilantro, and before you know it, summer will be here and we’ll all be be eating fish tacos on the beach.

Coriander cures spring fever!

 

Categories: Hot Topics, Notes from the Field, Spice Notes | 1 Comment