Global Cuisines

Paprika Potatoes

Paprika Potatoes

Smoked paprika is an indispensable ingredient in any spice pantry, and the authors of Fresh & Fermented agree! Check out their delicious recipe below!

“Smoked paprika, also known as pimentón, has finally reached mainstream status in the spice world, and not a minute too soon. Made from pimento peppers that have been dried or smoked over a fire, this spice imparts a robust smoky flavor. As a hearty side, this dish pairs well with your favorite sausages, pork loin, or any grilled meat. Leftovers are delicious with eggs in a breakfast burrito or scrambled into a breakfast hash.”

Paprika Potatoes

Serving Size: Makes 4 to 6 servings

Paprika Potatoes

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, butter, or coconut oil
  • 1 large or 2 small yellow onions, diced (about 2 cups)
  • 6 medium unpeeled red potatoes, cut into medium dice (about 3 cups)
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon smoked paprika (pimentón)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 cups stemmed, thinly sliced kale (about ½ pound)
  • 1 cup caraway Kraut

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the potatoes and sauté, stirring every few minutes, until they’re tender, another 15 to 18 minutes. Add the paprika, smoked paprika, salt, and pepper. Sauté until the spices are fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the kale and sauté until it’s just wilted but still vibrantly green, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the potato mixture to a large serving bowl.
  2. Take the kraut out of the jar with a clean fork, letting any extra brine drain back into it. Roughly chop the kraut and add it to the potatoes, tossing thoroughly to incorporate.
  3. Serve immediately, while the potatoes are still warm.
  4. Note: Try soaking cubed potatoes in a bowl of water for an hour to help release the starches, which will help prevent sticking. Drain and lightly dry the potatoes with a towel before cooking.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/paprika-potatoes/

*(c)2014 By Julie O’Brien and Richard Climenhage. All rights reserved. Excerpted from Fresh & Fermented: 85 Delicious Ways to Make Fermented Carrots, Kraut, and Kimchi Part of Every Meal by permission of Sasquatch Books. Photography by Charity Burggraaf

Categories: Cookbook Club, Eastern Europe, Global Cuisines, Hot Topics, Mediterranean, Recipes, Sides | Leave a comment

Caraway Kraut

Our April Cookbook Club selection is Fresh & Fermented: 85 Delicious Ways to Make Fermented Carrots, Kraut, and Kimchi Part of Every Meal by Julie O’Brien and Richard Climenhage. Join us to taste and learn about the mysteries of kraut! Here’s a sneak peek at one of their recipes…
Caraway Kraut 2

“We didn’t start making Caraway Kraut until our third year in business—we just weren’t sure if our customers would like the distinctive caraway flavor. When we started experimenting, however, it took just one test batch to convince us that Caraway Kraut belonged in Firefly’s lineup of fermented foods.

Caraway Kraut contributes its pleasing earthy taste to some of the recipes in this book and also makes a great side dish for grilled meats or mashed potatoes. It’s the perfect addition to the classic Reuben (of course) and adds intrigue to potato salads and coleslaws too. Whirl it with fresh avocado for a simple sandwich spread or as a dip for chips and veggies. (The acid does double duty—it adds flavor and keeps the avocado from getting brown.)

Caraway Kraut brine, which results from the fermentation process, is a delicious tonic on its own. For hundreds of years people have been drinking sauerkraut brine to heal ulcers or temper hangovers—it’s a well-known Russian remedy—and that inspired us to start bottling and selling the extra brine as our first Tummy Tonic.”

Caraway Kraut

Yield: Makes about 1 quart

Caraway Kraut

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Peel off any older, discolored outer leaves from the cabbage, reserving the leaves, and rinse the head. Quarter and core the cabbage, reserving the core. Slice the cabbage into 1/8-1/4 inch-wide strips. You should have about 12 cups of shredded cabbage.
  2. Put the cabbage in a large bowl and sprinkle it with the salt. Use your hands to thoroughly work the salt into the cabbage. When the cabbage has shrunk to about half its original volume and has generated a briny, watery base, taste it and add more salt or water if necessary. Stir in the caraway seeds, making sure they’re evenly distributed throughout the ferment.
  3. Pack the cabbage tightly into a quart jar until it’s about 2 inches below the rim, weighing it down with the reserved leaves and core. Make sure the brine completely covers the compressed cabbage by about 1 inch, and that it’s about 1 inch below the rim of the jar. Let the jar sit at room temperature, roughly 64 to 70 degrees F, topping the cabbage with more brine if needed. The kraut could be ready to eat after 1 week (or let it ferment longer for a richer taste). Store it in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

Notes

Make It Quick & Simple

Start with 2 cups of your own Classic Kraut, or 1 pound plain unpasteurized sauerkraut from your local market. (You’ll find it in the refrigerator case.)

Stir 1 to 1½ teaspoons of crushed caraway seeds into the kraut and mix well. Crush the caraway seeds using a mortar and pestle, rolling pin, or clean coffee grinder. Break them down, but don’t crush them to a powder. Crushing them helps the caraway flavor more fully permeate the kraut.

Pack the entire mixture into a jar, and top off with as much Brine as needed to cover the kraut.

Let the jar sit at room temperature out of bright light for about a week, and then refrigerate. It’s ready to eat; however, the longer you let it ferment, the more fully the flavors will develop.

https://www.silkroaddiary.com/caraway-kraut/

*(c)2014 By Julie O’Brien and Richard Climenhage. All rights reserved. Excerpted from Fresh & Fermented: 85 Delicious Ways to Make Fermented Carrots, Kraut, and Kimchi Part of Every Meal by permission of Sasquatch Books. Photography by Charity Burggraaf.

Categories: Cookbook Club, Eastern Europe, Healthy, Hot Topics, Recipes, Sides, Snacky Bits | Leave a comment

Piment d’Espelette

espelettehouseok2It’s here! This season’s crop of Piment d’Espelette arrived at our doorstep this week, ready to transform our dishes with its mild heat and fruity, almost tomatoey flavor. Piment d’Espelette’s mild flavor is the cornerstone of the traditional Basque stews, and in keeping with Basque tradition we consume our Piment d’Espelette seasonally, making way for each new crop when it comes in.

The seasonal rotation isn’t the only thing traditional about the pepper of Espelette. Piment d’Espelette bears the distinction of being the only spice with an official AOC designation. Being recognized by the AOC, or Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, guarantees that the product which bears its seal will be produced in traditional manners, and originate only from their traditional region. In such illustrious company as true french Champagne, only the superior pepper grown in the ten, tiny approved Basque villages may be labeled as Piment d’Espelette.

Piment d’Espelette originates in the area that joins the southwestern-most corner of France with northeastern Spain, historically known as Basque country. In the region, late summer and early fall are marked by festoons of peppers drying against white stucco houses, just as they have for centuries. Each October, the end of the harvest is marked by a vibrant festival, complete with parade, where peppers are sold fresh, pickled, or dried and ground, as we carry it.

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The Basque have another tradition worth imitating- that of the txoko, or gastronomical society. Generations of Basques have gotten together to cook, sing, and experiment with food in thousands of private clubs. While it might not have centuries of tradition, we’ve got a kind-of txoko of our own, the World Spice Cookbook Club, that meets up to try out recipes from a new cookbook each month. Singing is purely optional.

So come pick up some of the freshest and most flavorful flakes of Piment d’Espelette available in the United States by the ounce or by the jar, and if you’re feeling adventurous drop us a line and come out to the next meeting of our Cookbook Club for a little gastronomical bonding. On egin!

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Categories: Cookbook Club, French, Hot Topics, Mediterranean, Notes from the Field, Spice Notes | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Steve’s Sweet and Spicy Drumsticks

street food

We are always on the lookout for new and interesting spice combinations, and this one is fabulous! It came from our globe trotting friend and fan, Steve R., and features the savory spice blend Tabil along with Piri Piri and Smokin’ Hot Garlic Pepper bringing the heat. The drumsticks get a quick brine to help them retain moisture and the spices flow into a sweet citrus sauce that hits all the hot-sour-salty-sweet flavors that shine in Asian cuisine. Steve was inspired by his travels- and love of street food- to create this fusion BBQ sauce, and we are so happy that he shared this recipe! We’re planning to try it on wings next.

steves drumsticks

Steve’s Sweet and Spicy Drumsticks

Steve’s Sweet and Spicy Drumsticks

Ingredients

  • 1 pkg chicken drumsticks (6 - 8)
  • 1 tablespoon Himalayan pink salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon ground Piri Piri
  • 1 tablespoon ground Tabil
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Nuoc Mau (Vietnamese caramelized coconut sauce) - if you can't find it, you can substitute blackstrap molasses instead
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon Smokin' Hot Garlic Pepper

Instructions

  1. Rinse chicken and place in a resealable plastic bag. In a small bowl, dissolve the salt in the water and pour over the chicken. Seal the bag, shake, and set aside in the refrigerator for 1 hour.
  2. While chicken is brining, mix together the remaining ingredients in a bowl and set aside for the flavors to blend.
  3. Remove chicken from brine, rinse and pat dry. Put the drumsticks and the spice mixture into another resealable plastic bag, mix and place in the refrigerator for 5 hours (or overnight).
  4. Preheat your grill or the oven to 400 degrees. Cook, turning once, for about 22-24 minutes (or until the meat runs clear when pricked with a knife).
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/steves-sweet-spicy-drumsticks/

Thanks so much, Steve! Safe travels, and stay in touch :-)

Steve R.

Categories: Africa, Course, Global Cuisines, Grilling Season, Recipes, Sides, Snacky Bits | Leave a comment

Sassy Short Ribs

We love all things sassy, and these short ribs are no exception. The bold flavor of our Sassy Steak Spice is infused into every bite along with orange marmalade and fresh oregano for an impeccable flavor combination. The great charm in this dish is the layers of flavor developed by adding spices in stages along the way, and finishing with fresh herbs… who says you can’t have it all? The melt-in-your-mouth beef is pretty good too.

sassy short ribs

Sassy Short Ribs

Sassy Short Ribs

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil
  • 3 pounds small bone-in beef short ribs
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons Sassy Steak Spice, divided
  • 3/4 cup orange marmalade
  • 3/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh oregano, divided

Instructions

  1. Add the oil to a heavy, medium skillet, over medium heat. Working in batches- brown the short ribs, about 2 minutes each side. Transfer the seared ribs to a platter or bowl.
  2. Add the chopped onion to the skillet and sauté until soft, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle the Sassy Steak Spice over the onion and cook one minute more. Lower the heat and add the marmalade, cooking just long enough to melt it with the onion. Transfer the mixture to the insert of a 5-6 quart slow cooker, scraping out every tasty bit!
  3. Add the chicken broth, red wine and soy sauce to the cooker and stir to combine. Now nestle the ribs into the sauce and cook on high for 5-6 hours or low for 9 hours, until the meat is fork tender. Don't peek while it is cooking! You want all those luscious flavors to circulate for the whole cooking time.
  4. At the end of the cooking time, transfer the ribs to a serving platter and then strain the sauce into a fat-separator. Remove the strained bits of meat and onion to top the ribs on the serving platter and, after the fat has separated, pour the de-fatted sauce into a medium saucepan.
  5. Add the remaining teaspoon of Sassy Steak Spice and simmer the sauce 4-6 minutes to reduce and concentrate the flavors. Add 1 teaspoon of the oregano and cook 1 minute more.
  6. Pour the sauce over the ribs and garnish with the remaining teaspoon of oregano.
  7. Serve with brown or white rice, and lightly sautéed chard and/or bok choy.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/sassy-short-ribs/

Tip: For those of you with slow cooker inserts that are stovetop safe, go ahead and use it in place of the skillet to start the sauce and save a dish!

sassy steak spice

 

Categories: Asia, Course, Global Cuisines, Latin America, Main Meals, Recipes, Slow Cooker | Leave a comment

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Many foods convey a sense of place. Unless you are lucky enough to be in China, there’s no doubt that Chinese food tastes best delivered on a stormy night in the 212 area code. But for those of us outside the delivery area, there has to be an alternative and this is it – Take-Out/Fake-Out: Lemon Chicken.

Lemon Chicken

While it may not be as easy as dialing up the Chelsea Big Wok, this juicy crockpot lemon chicken is the next best thing. Set it and forget it, and at the end of the day just stir fry your favorite vegetables to serve alongside and enjoy. We have tried many spice blends in this dish and they are ALL fantastic, so whether you are in the mood for a little Thai Seasoning or Indonesian Ayam, take your pick, it is hard to go wrong with lemon chicken.

lemon_chicken_2

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Ingredients

  • 2-3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/4 cup, plus 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Thai Seasoning, divided
  • 1 teaspoon Rooster Spice (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • Lemon wedges, Gomasio and sliced scallions for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Rinse the chicken thighs well, and pat dry.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together the chicken broth, sliced onion, soy sauce, honey, 1/4 cup lemon juice, rice wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon Thai Seasoning and 1 teaspoon Rooster Spice. Stir the sauce well to combine, and pour it into a 5-6 quart crock pot.
  3. Nestle the chicken pieces in the sauce and cook on low for 4-5 hours, until the chicken easily pulls apart with a fork.
  4. Using a slotted spoon, remove the chicken from the crock pot and set aside. Adjust the crockpot to high heat.
  5. In a small measuring cup, mix together the arrowroot and cold water to make a slurry. Add the slurry to the sauce in the crockpot, then add the sesame oil, 1 additional teaspoon Thai Seasoning and remaining 2 tablespoons of lemon juice. Allow the sauce to simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened.
  6. Adjust the heat setting to warm or low, and return the chicken to the crockpot and gently shred the pieces before serving.
  7. Serve with rice and vegetables, and garnish with a lemon wedge, Gomasio and sliced scallions. Some folks like an extra sprinkle of Rooster Spice as well.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/take-fake-lemon-chicken/

gomasio

Categories: Asia, Course, Global Cuisines, Main Meals, Recipes, Slow Cooker, Take-Out/Fake-Out | Leave a comment