browser icon
You are using an insecure version of your web browser. Please update your browser!
Using an outdated browser makes your computer unsafe. For a safer, faster, more enjoyable user experience, please update your browser today or try a newer browser.

Tagged With: Vegan

Coriander Roasted Beets

Ready to Roast!

Ready to Roast!

Roasting beets concentrates their flavor and the complement of coriander is delicious. We like to roast a whole pan-full and serve them as a side dish or atop a dark leafy green salad of chard, kale and spinach. Choose beets of a similar size so they cook at about the same rate, and both the gold and red varieties can be used alone or in combination. The spice mix of coriander, sesame, marjoram and urfa is bright and pleasing with just a hint of mild heat. Inspired by our love of dukkah and Israeli za’atar, this blend is a variation on those themes with coriander taking center stage.

Toasted Coriander and Sesame

Toasted Coriander and Sesame

This spice mixture goes well with other roasted vegetables too- like carrots or parsnips and can be used as a crust on meat and seafood. You can vary the consistency to go with your dish- we like it medium-fine to sprinkle on vegetables and a more coarse to use as a crust. For another variation, grind the coriander seeds, but leave the sesame seeds whole for additional crunch.

Medium-fine texture for vegetables.

Medium-fine texture for vegetables.

Out of the oven, these beets have heavenly, and healthy flavor. Enjoy.

Coriander Roasted Beets

Coriander Roasted Beets

Coriander Roasted Beets

Ingredients

For the beets
8-10 medium beets, golden or red
2 teaspoons avocado oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
For the spice blend
1 teaspoon white sesame seeds
2 teaspoons Indian coriander
2 teaspoons European coriander
1 teaspoon marjoram
1/2 teaspoon urfa biber
2 teaspoons avocado oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees
  2. Scrub the beets clean and arrange them in a cast iron skillet or Dutch oven. Coat with avocado oil and sprinkle with salt. Cover the pan tightly and roast the beets for 45-60 minutes, until they can easily be pierced with a fork.
  3. While the beets are roasting, prepare the spices. In a heavy dry pan over medium heat, toast the sesame and coriander seeds until they are lightly browned. Remove to a plate to cool.
  4. Crush the toasted sesame and coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle, or pulse in an electric mill, to a medium-fine consistency. Then add the marjoram and urfa and crush or pulse gently to combine. Add the Murray River flake salt.
  5. Remove the beets from the oven and increase the oven temperature to 400 degrees.
  6. Allow the beets to cool to the touch. Slice off the tops and the peel the beets. The skins should slip off easily.
  7. Chop the beets into quarters or eighths and place them in a large bowl. Drizzle with the avocado oil and toss to coat. Sprinkle the spice mixture over the beets and spread them on a grill pan.
  8. Roast 10 minutes more to fuse the spice flavors with the beets.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/roasted-beets-coriander-crust/

Categories: Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Besar Cranberry Chutney

The rich and toasty taste of our Besar blend makes an ideal complement for the pop of fresh cranberry in this exotic twist on a holiday classic. Candied ginger and dried apricots round out the fruity flavors, and the result is an intensely flavored chutney that you can serve well past Thanksgiving. You can try variations too- add an apple to mellow the flavors or some chopped walnuts for a little crunch. Any way you make it, the bright flavor of cranberries add a bit of sunshine to a winter feast. Go cranberries!

Besar Cranberry Chutney is good year round!

Besar Cranberry Chutney is good year round!

Besar Cranberry Chutney

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 bag (12 oz) fresh cranberries
1 onion, diced (use a sweet or red onion for extra flavor)
1/4 cup Candied Ginger, chopped
1/2 cup dried apricots, chopped
1 large orange (or 2 medium), zested and juiced
1 lime, juiced
3/4 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup cider vinegar
3 tablespoons Besar, ground
2 teaspoons Aleppo pepper

Instructions

  1. Put olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the diced onions and saute for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients and, stirring frequently, cooking for about 15 minutes. Taste for seasoning. You might want to add more salt, vinegar or brown sugar.
  3. If you want a 'smoother' sauce, cook for another 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Let cool, then put into a covered container in the refrigerator. This will keep for about a week.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/besar-cranberry-chutney/

 

Categories: Global Cuisines, Hot Topics, Middle East, North America, Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Continental Curry Biryani

It’s almost Buddha’s birthday! Buddha’s birthday is celebrated on the eighth day of the fourth month of the Chinese lunar calendar in nearly all east-Asian countries. This year it falls on Friday, May 17th in the Western calendar. Because it is customary to eat rice on Buddha’s birthday, we developed this heavily spiced vegetarian biryani to honor the Buddha and many of the exotic lands from which our spices come. Our Continental Curry is the perfect blend for this occasion, as it combines the best elements of several varieties of yellow curry. While we can’t promise a permanent Nirvana as a result of this dish, we guarantee at least a transient one!

Continental Curry Biryani

.

 

Continental Curry Biryani

Ingredients

For the Rice
1 cup basmati rice, well rinsed
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 red onion, thinly sliced
1 big pinch of saffron
2 tablespoons golden raisins
2 tablespoons cashews, chopped
1/4 teaspoon cloves, whole
1/2 teaspoon cumin seed, whole
2 cups water
For the Curry Paste
6 large cloves garlic, chopped
3 inch piece of ginger, chopped
2 tablespoons Continental Curry, ground
2 medium onions, chopped
7 mint leaves
1 jalapeno, chopped
2 roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1 tablesoon olive oil
1/2 cup broccoli florets
1/2 cup cauliflower florets
1/2 cup green beans, cut into 1 inch pieces
1/2 cup peas
1 medium sweet potato, cut into 1 inch pieces
1/2 cup water
For Baking the Biryani
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1/2 cup warm milk
1 pinch saffron
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large red onion, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons cashews, chopped
Pan spray
Greek yougurt

Instructions

    For the Rice
  1. In a medium-sized pan over medium heat, add the oil. When hot, add the onion and cook until softened.
  2. Add raisins, cashews, cloves, cumin, Indian coriander, green cardamom and cassia sticks.
  3. Saute spices until fragrant and the seeds start to "pop", about 3 minutes.
  4. Add salt, water and saffron and bring to a boil.
  5. Add rice and turn heat down to simmer.
  6. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes. Rice will be 3/4 of the way cooked. Spread in a shallow pan to cool.
  7. While rice is cooking, par-cook the vegetables. In a shallow pan over medium-high heat, add the vegetables and water. Cover and steam for about 5 minutes.
  8. For the Paste
  9. In a food processor, puree the garlic, ginger, onions, mint leaves, Continental Curry, jalapeno, salt and tomato.
  10. In a medium saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil.
  11. Add paste and saute for 5 minutes.
  12. Add par cooked vegetables, stirring well to combine. Taste for seasoning and salt.
  13. To Bake the Biryani
  14. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  15. In a small saucepan, warm a pinch of saffron and the milk. Remove from heat.
  16. Spray a large ovenproof casserole dish with pan spray.
  17. Layer in half of the rice and sprinkle with half of the cilantro.
  18. Evenly spread the vegetable curry paste mixture over the rice.
  19. Top with remaining rice and sprinkle with remainder of cilantro.
  20. Drizzle with the saffron-infused milk.
  21. Cover the casserole dish and bake for 15 minutes, until the rice is cooked through.
  22. Turn the oven off and let the biryani stay in the hot oven for another 10 minutes.
  23. While the biryani is baking, heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat.
  24. Add the sliced onions and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels.
  25. Add chopped cashews and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels.
  26. Remove the biryani for the oven.
  27. Top with fried onions and cashews.
  28. Serve with Greek yogurt on the side.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/continental-spice-biriyani/

Categories: Asia, Curries & Masalas, Global Cuisines, Holiday, Indian Subcontinent, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Harissa and Vegetable Couscous

This recipe has been a long time coming. Hardly anyone who comes in to the shop — spice masters and novices alike — can pass over the North African section without some long, lingering sniffs. The spices from that region are so exotic, in their perfect union of sweet-spicy-aromatic. “How do you use the Harissa?” is one of the most common questions following the exclamations of delight, and though my fellow merchants and I have written versions of this recipe on many a business card, envelope, and scratch paper, it’s about time it took its place among our favorites here on the blog.

The tender-crisp vegetables and fluffy cous cous are a perfect vehicle for this sumptuous sauce; our version of the traditional Tunisian red pepper condiment that is so ubiquitous in Northern Africa. The cumin, coriander, and caraway add complexity and depth, with the guajillos lending just enough heat to be interesting without being overwhelming. You can also try the Harissa sauce on grilled meats or eggplant — or even on halibut!

.

 

Harissa and Vegetable Couscous

Ingredients

For the Harissa –
 
6 ounce can of tomato paste
12 ounce jar roasted peppers
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small red onion, chopped
2 tablespoons Harissa, ground
1-1/2 teaspoon garlic granules
1/3 cup olive oil
¼ cup red wine vinegar
4 green onions, sliced thinly
 
For the couscous –
 
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 small sweet onion, chopped
6 large garlic cloves, chopped
2-1/4 cup vegetable broth
1 cup dried apricots, chopped
1 small acorn or butternut squash (cut into ½ inch cubes)
1 small cauliflower, florets cut into small pieces
1 medium zucchini (cut into ½ inch cubes)
1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
2 teaspoons turmeric
1 teaspoon ginger powder
1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper
6 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
¾ cup fresh or thawed green peas
½ cup chopped cilantro
1-1/2 cups couscous

Instructions

  1. To make the Harissa – In a small saute pan on medium heat, add 1 tablespoon olive oil. When hot, add the chopped red onion, and saute until it starts to get a little color. Meanwhile, in a blender, combine the tomato paste, roasted peppers, Harissa, garlic granules, 1/3 cup olive oil and red wine vinegar. Pulse until it’s still a little chunky. (You can also puree it until it’s smooth.)
  2. Transfer to a bowl and add salt to taste. Add the sauteed red onions and green onions and mix well. (You can prepare this ahead of time – let it get to room temperature before serving. If you have any leftovers, it will keep well in the refrigerator. This works well as a condiment to any meal.)
  3. To make the Couscous – In a large Dutch oven, heat the oil over low heat. Saute the onion and garlic until translucent. Add stock, dried apricots, squash, zucchini, cauliflower florets, chickpeas, turmeric, ginger powder and Aleppo pepper, stirring well. Turn up the heat and bring to a boil. Place the cover on the pot, reducing the heat to medium and simmer until the vegetables are tender, but still a bit crispy. This should take about 5 minutes.
  4. Then mix in the diced tomatoes, peas, cilantro and couscous. Remove the pot from the heat, cover and let stand 10 minutes. (This will cook the couscous.)
  5. Remove the lid and fluff the couscous with a fork. Transfer to a serving dish and drizzle some of the Harissa onto the couscous, serving the rest of the Harissa on the side.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/harissa-and-vegetable-couscous/

Categories: Africa, Main Meals, Mediterranean, Sides, Snacky Bits | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

A word of advice from a novice gardener: Carrots are much bigger than carrot seeds. Somehow, fifty-odd square feet of garden space doesn’t seem like that much when it’s being planted, but it can produce a surprising haul, most especially in the carrot department. Praise be that carrots are delicious, so their being excessively plentiful is a problem I’m thankful to have! This soup is hearty and delicious, made velvety by the soft puree of carrots, and from the toasted rice in the Poudre de Colombo curry. We’ve dressed it up a little with the prawns, but this soup can easily be made vegan by omitting them, and using red miso paste in favor of the Worcestershire powder.  If you’re short on time, or you perhaps planned your garden space better than I did, and therefore the creative utilization of carrots is not a pressing issue for you, a can of pumpkin puree is an excellent substitution.

.

 

Poudre de Colombo Carrot Soup

Ingredients

Olive oil, for sautéing
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1.5 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
1.5 # carrots, peeled and chopped
3 cups chicken, vegetable, or homemade seafood stock if you're so lucky
3/4 cups mild, dry white wine
1 California Bay Leaf
1/4 cup Poudre De Colombo Curry, ground
Sel de Mer or Murray River Flake salt
1 can coconut milk
1 tablespoon Worcestershire Powder
Juice of 1 lime, plus wedges from 1 more for serving
Pinch of brown or raw sugar
Freshly picked cilantro leaves for garnish
12 prawns
1 Tablespoon Hungarian Paprika
1 Teaspoon Indian Cayenne

Instructions

  1. Heat oil, and sauté onions, garlic, ginger, and carrots for five minutes
  2. Deglaze with wine, and reduce until pan is nearly dry
  3. Add stock, bay leaf, and 1 tablespoon of the curry, cover, and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 15 minutes.
  4. Remove bay leaf. In a food processer or blender, puree soup until smooth. Work in small batches for best- and safest- results, adding in the coconut milk to aid in the blending.
  5. Strain the processed soup through a wire mesh strainer in to a clean pot, and return the mixture to the stove over low heat.
  6. Add the remaining coconut milk, Worcestershire powder, sugar, and curry, 1 tablespoon at a time, until desired seasoning level is reached.
  7. Add lime juice, and adjust for salt.
  8. Rub prawns with paprika and cayenne, and grill or sear them.
  9. Ladle soup in to bowls, and garnish each with two prawns, a wedge of lime, and a few leaves of cilantro.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/poudre-de-colombo-carrot-soup/

Categories: Caribbean, Curries & Masalas, Fruits of the Sea, Main Meals, North America, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Indian Coriander Energy Bars

Sometimes I get so busy doing things that I forget to eat breakfast and/or lunch. I know, I shouldn’t do that, but I do. I’ve tried various power or energy bars, but I find them too sweet, lacking in flavor, or really just not very healthy.  So I set out to make an energy bar that tasted good, was high in all of the “good” stuff we’re supposed to be eating every day, and was full of things that I loved (like Indian Coriander). I’m also a huge fan of chia seeds, and using them eliminated the need to use oil or eggs in my energy bars. (Chia seeds are full of essential fatty acids, antioxidents, calcium, iron, fiber, and are a source of natural extended energy.)

I’ve found this to be a great recipe for experimentation and using up tasty odds and ends. Got a quarter cup left of fig butter? Put it in your next batch. Found an apple or banana you need to use? Mash the banana or grate the apple, and add it to your next batch. (These are also good with grated carrots, too.) I’ll make these every week or so, and bring them into the shop. Somehow, they always seem to disappear…there are even some days where I might actually get one or two pieces! (We have some sneaky people here at the shop, especially where baked goods are concerned.) They’re always a big hit, and no one feels guilty about eating them. Yes, I will admit to sometimes putting chocolate chips in them, but chocolate is good for you, too, right?

Dried cherries and almonds make this a tasty treat…and it’s good for you, too!

 

Indian Coriander Energy Bars

Ingredients

¼ cup chia seeds (can usually find these at Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or check your local Latin market)
1 cup water or juice
½ cup high-fiber cereal (like Fiber One or Bran Buds)
½ cup non-white flour (like whole wheat, oat or spelt)
1 cup Scottish or Irish oatmeal (not instant or quick cooking)
1 cup raw or toasted nuts (any variety – can also use pumpkin or sunflower seeds)
1 cup dried fruit, in bite sized pieces (any variety, any mixture)
¼ cup pure maple syrup or honey
1 orange, zested and juiced

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees. Line an 8 x 8 pan with foil, making sure that you have extra hanging over the sides. (This will make it easier to take the bars out of the pan, as there is no fat used in this recipe. Just pull the foil & bars out, and your pan is still clean!)
  2. In a small bowl, add the chia seeds and water. Whisk together with a fork, being careful to make sure that all of the seeds are submerged in the water. Set aside for 10 minutes, gently stirring after 5 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the Indian Coriander, high-fiber cereal, non-white flour, oatmeal, salt, nuts, dried fruit and Poudre Douce. Mix together well.
  4. Add the maple syrup or honey and the orange zest and juice to the rehydrated chia seeds. Stir well. Add to the ingredients in the large bowl, using a rubber spatula to scrape out all of the chia seeds. Gently mix all of the ingredients together. (It will look like it won’t come together, but it will. If it find that it might need some more liquid, add a tablespoon or two of orange or grapefruit juice. You just want the ingredients to “bind” together – it won’t look like any batter you’ve worked with!) This makes a slightly soft bar - if you want a more cake-like bar, add about 1/4 cup more juice.
  5. Scoop out into the foil-lined pan and press down to fill every corner, smoothing out as you do it. Bake for 20 – 30 minutes – when you touch the center of the bar mixture, it should be very firm.
  6. If you want a drier, firmer bar, cook for an extra 5 - 10 minutes. Let cool in the pan. Then remove, using the foil.
  7. Place a cutting board on top of the pan and flip it over, so that the pan is on top of the board. Unwrap the bar from the foil carefully, and cut the bar into pieces. It’s great cut into bite-sized pieces, or just cut into 16 bars. Place in a zip loc bag or covered container and keep in the refrigerator. These will keep for over a week.
http://www.silkroaddiary.com/indian-coriander-energy-bars/

Categories: North America, Recipes, Snacky Bits, Sweet Somethings | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment