Asia

Sri Lankan Black Curry Chicken Banh Mi

https://www.worldspice.com/blends/curry-sri-lankanThe World Spice Cookbook Club is grilling, steaming and frying at the August 2015 Meet & Eat. We are all cooking from Andrea Nguyen’s classic Asian Dumplings: Mastering Gyoza, Spring Rolls, Samosas, and More and her more recent and crazy-popular The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy-Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches. We are going to taste so many different types of banh mi, and this is perhaps the most anticipated maybe because we are all so fond of our Sri Lankan Curry.

From the author: When Viet people eat curry with baguette, they typically dip the bread into the spiced coconut-scented sauce. San Francisco chef Alex Ong sent me his recipe for this bewitching curry (the name comes from the dark-colored spice blend), insisting that it would be perfect stuffed inside a baguette for banh mi. He was right, but to avoid a soggy sandwich, I hand shredded the cooked chicken and recooked it in the sauce, allowing it to fry in the residual oil and become encrusted with the seasonings. It became like an Indonesian rendang or, as my husband put it, a curried chicken carnitas. It’s fantastic.

 

Sri Lankan Black Curry Chicken Banh Mi

Total Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Yield: 6 sandwiches

Ingredients

  • 1/2teaspoon cardamom, ground
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground mace or nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon cloves, ground
  • 1 teaspoon cumin, ground
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons coriander, ground
  • 3 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
  • A hefty 3/4-inch (2-cm) knob of ginger, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 slender stalk of lemon-grass, trimmed and coarsely chopped (2 to 3 tablespoons)
  • 1 large Fresno or jalapeño chile, coarsely chopped
  • 3/4 cup (3.5 oz/115 g) coarsely chopped shallot
  • 1-3/4 pounds (800 g) boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 tablespoons virgin coconut or canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/3 cups (330 ml) coconut milk

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl, combine the cardamom, pepper, cinnamon, mace, cloves, cumin, and coriander. Set the spice blend near the stove. Use a mini or full-size food processor to finely chop the garlic, ginger, lemongrass, chile, and shallot. Keep by the spices. Trim the chicken of large fat pads and set nearby.
  2. In a 4-quart (4 l) pot, heat the oil over high heat. When hot enough to sizzle a mustard seed upon contact, add all of the mustard seeds. Swirl or stir for about 10 seconds, until a few seeds crackle and pop, then add the shallot mixture. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring, until no longer raw smelling.
  3. Lower the heat slightly, add the spice blend, and stir for about 30 seconds, until toasty and a dark chocolate color. Add the chicken, turning to coat with seasonings. Add the salt and coconut milk, which should barely cover the chicken; add water if necessary. Adjust the heat to simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent scorching; the pot contents will shrink to roughly half the original volume. Remove from the heat and let cool for 20 minutes.
  4. Transfer the chicken to a plate and hand shred, with the grain, into pinkie finger–wide pieces; set aside. Pour the sauce into a large nonstick skillet. Over high heat, vigorously simmer for about 6 minutes, stirring frequently, until reduced by half and pools of coconut oil dot the surface. Lower the heat slightly, then add the chicken and any accumulated sauce. Cook, stirring frequently, for 8 to 12 minutes, until the chicken has darkened to a rich brown and is coated with crusty seasoning; the sauce will no longer be visible and the chicken will gently fry in hissing oil.
  5. Cool slightly, then season with extra salt, if needed. For great flavor, enjoy the chicken slightly above room temperature in banh mi.
  6. Notes
  7. To let the rich, spiced chicken shine in a black curry chicken banh mi, use just a bit of regular mayo and omit or go light on Maggi. Add pickled shallots, chile, cucumber, and cilantro. Try as a regular banh mi or slider.
  8. Refrigerate for up to 3 days, reheating in a microwave oven or a skillet over medium heat, with a splash of water to moisten and refresh. Perfect for make-ahead banh mi. Instead of fresh chile, add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of cayenne to the spice blend. Or substitute 2 tablespoons of a favorite curry powder for the spice blend (our Sri Lankan Curry would be perfect). If you have fresh curry leaf (Murraya koenigii), fry 5 or 6 large leaves along with the mustard seeds; remove the leaves before reducing the sauce
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/sri-lankan-black-curry-chicken-banh-mi/

Banh mi handbook

 

The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy-Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches is one of the August selection for the World Spice Cookbook Club. The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy-Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches is currently available for purchase at our retail store.

Reprinted with permission from The Banh Mi Handbook by Andrea Nguyen. Copyright © 2014 Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc. Photography © 2014 by Paige Green

 

Categories: Asia, Breads, Cookbook Club, Main Meals, Recipes | Leave a comment

Pan-fried Pork and Scallion Mini Buns (Sheng Jian Baozi) with Chile Oil

Panfried Pork and Scallion Mini BunsThe World Spice Cookbook Club is grilling, steaming and frying at the August 2015 Meet & Eat. We are all cooking from Andrea Nguyen’s classic Asian Dumplings: Mastering Gyoza, Spring Rolls, Samosas, and More and her more recent, crazy-popular The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy-Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches. Sherrie from World Spice Retail is cooking up these mini buns, and we can’t wait to try them!

From the author: If you like pot stickers and steamed buns, you’ll love these spongy-crisp pan-fried treats from Shanghai, where typically they are cooked in humongous shallow pans (much like large paella pans) with wooden lids. These buns are made of yeast dough that is filled with an aromatic pork mixture and then fried and steamed in a skillet. Cooking under cover with a bit of water delivers plenty of moisture to puff up the buns. Ground beef chuck or chicken thigh can stand in for the pork in this recipe. A bāozi is a mini bāo (bun) and for that reason, I like to keep these true to their name and shape small ones. However, you can elect to form sixteen medium-size (23/4-inch) buns. Roll the dough circles out to 3-1/4 inches in diameter and use about 4 teaspoons of filing for each bun; increase the water and cooking time a tad.

There are several methods for making Chinese yeast dough, some of which employ starters and leavening, such as lye water and ammonium carbonate. Th is dough uses ingredients available at regular American supermarkets, and the results match the best I’ve experienced in China. Many Asian cooks employ—to great success—a cakey, snowy-white Cantonese-style dough made from low-gluten cake flour or from a quickie flour and baking powder blend. This dough is different; it has more depth, and its loft and resilience comes from combining yeast and baking powder; fast-rising yeast works like a champ. All-purpose flour with a moderate amount of gluten, such as Gold Medal brand widely available at supermarkets, is what I prefer for this dough. Use bleached flour for a slightly lighter and brighter finish.

Used in Chinese, Japanese, and Southeast Asian cooking, chile oil is easy to prepare at home, and it’s infinitely better than store-bought. Its intense heat enlivens many foods, especially dumplings, which benefit when chile oil is part of the dipping sauce or used as a garnish. Some cooks add aromatics, such as ginger, star anise, and Sichuan peppercorns, to the oil, but I like to keep the chile flavor pure. While you may use other cooking oils, such as canola oil, my preference is for the kind of peanut oil often sold at Chinese markets, which is cold pressed and filled with the aroma of roasted peanuts. It is texturally light, has a high smoking point, and offers a wonderful nuttiness that pairs well with the intense chile heat. Lion & Globe peanut oil from Hong Kong is terrific. Use just the infused oil or include the chile flakes for an extra brow-wiping experience.

 

Pan-fried Pork and Scallion Mini Buns (Sheng Jian Baozi) with Chile Oil

Yield: 32 small buns;1-1/4 cups chile oil

Ingredients

    DOUGH
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons rapid-rise (instant) dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 12-1/2 ounces (2-1/2 cups) bleached or unbleached all-purpose flour
  • FILLING
  • 1-1/4 pounds Basic Yeast Dough, preferably made with unbleached flour
  • 10 ounces fatty ground pork, coarsely chopped to loosen
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped Chinese chives or scallions (white and green parts)
  • 1/4 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon light (regular) soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 tablespoon finely shredded fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup Chinkiang vinegar or balsamic vinegar
  • Light (regular) soy sauce (optional)
  • Chile Oil (optional)
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons canola oil
  • CHILE OIL
  • 1/4 cup dried chile flakes or coarsely ground dried chiles
  • 1 cup peanut (or canola) oil

Instructions

  1. Put the yeast in a small bowl, add the water, and set aside for 1 minute to soft en. Whisk in the oil to blend and dissolve the yeast. Set aside.
  2. To make the dough in a food processor, combine the sugar, baking powder, and flour in the work bowl. Pulse two or three times to combine. With the motor on, pour the yeast mixture through the feed tube in a steady stream and allow the machine to continue running, for about 20 seconds, or until the dough starts coming together into a ball. (If this doesn’t happen, add lukewarm water by the teaspoon.) Let the machine continue for 45 to 60 seconds to knead most of the dough into a large ball that cleans the sides of the bowl; expect some dangling bits. Press on the finished dough; it should feel medium-soft and tacky but should not stick to your finger.
  3. To make the dough by hand, combine the sugar, baking powder, and flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in the yeast mixture. Slowly stir with a wooden spoon, moving from the center toward the rim, to work in all the flour. (Add lukewarm water by the teaspoon if this doesn’t happen with relative ease.) Keep stirring as a ragged, soft mass forms. Then use your fingers to gather and pat the dough together into a ball. Transfer to a work surface and knead for about 5 minutes, or until smooth, fingertip soft , and slightly elastic. (You shouldn’t need any additional flour on the work surface if the dough was properly made. Keep kneading and after the first minute or two, the dough shouldn’t stick to your fingers. If it does, work in a sprinkling of flour.) Press your finger into the dough; the dough should spring back, with a faint indentation remaining.
  4. Regardless of the mixing method, lightly oil a clean bowl and add the dough. Cover with plastic wrap and put in a warm, draft -free place (for example, in an oven with the light on) to rise for about 45 minutes, or until nearly doubled. The dough is now ready to use.
  5. Though the dough can be left to sit for an hour or so after it has doubled, it’s best to have
  6. the filling already prepared, especially if it requires cooking and cooling. Alternatively, punch down the dough, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight. Return the dough to room temperature
  7. before using.
  8. To make the filling, combine the pork, ginger, and Chinese chives in a bowl. Use a fork or spatula to stir and mash the ingredients together.
  9. Combine the salt, white pepper, sugar, soy sauce, rice wine, sesame oil, and water in a small bowl and stir to combine well. Pour over the meat mixture, then vigorously stir to create a compact mixture. Cover the filling with plastic wrap and set aside for 30 minutes, or refrigerate overnight, returning it to room temperature before assembling the buns. There should be 1-1/3 cups of filling.
  10. Transfer the dough to a very lightly floured work surface, gather it into a ball if needed,and then pat it to flatten it to a thick disk. Cut the disk in half and cover one-half with plastic wrap or an inverted bowl to prevent drying while you work on the other half.
  11. Roll the dough into a 12 to 14-inch log, and then cut it into 16 pieces. (Halve the log first to make it easier to cut even-size pieces. The tapered end pieces should be cut a little longer than the rest.) Lightly roll each piece between your hands into a ball, then flatten each one into a 1/4-inch-thick disk.
  12. Use a wooden dowel–style rolling pin to roll the pieces into circles, each about 2-1/2 inches in diameter. The rim of each circle should be thinner than the center; keeping a 1-inch wide belly ensures consistent thickness all over the bun. The finished circle will thicken as it sits. Lay the finished circles out on your work surface, lightly dusting their bottoms with flour if you fear them sticking.
  13. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly dust with flour. To assemble a bun, hold a dough circle in a slightly cupped hand. Use a bamboo spatula, dinner knife, or spoon to center about 2 teaspoons of filling on the dough circle, pressing down very gently and keeping about 1/2 to 3/4 inch of the dough clear on all sides. Use the thumb of the hand cradling the bun to push down the filling while the other hand pulls up the dough edge and pleats and pinches the rim together to form a closed satchel. Pinch and twist to completely close. Place the bun, pleated side down, on the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining dough circles and filling. Loosely cover the buns with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft-free spot for 30 minutes, or until about 50 percent larger than their original size. Meanwhile, make buns from the remaining dough and filling.
  14. While the buns rise, divide the ginger and vinegar between 2 bowls. Taste and if the vinegar is too tart, add water by the teaspoon. Set these at the table along with the soy sauce and chile oil for guests to mix their own sauce.
  15. To pan fry the buns, use a medium or large nonstick skillet; if both sizes are handy, cook 2 batches at the same time. Heat the skillet(s) over medium heat and add 1 tablespoon of canola oil for a medium skillet and 1-1/2 tablespoons for a large one. Add the buns one at a time, arranging them, pleated side up, 1/2 inch apart; they will expand during cooking. (In general, medium skillets will fit 8 or 9 buns; large skillets will fit 12 or 13 buns.) Fry the buns for 1 to 2 minutes, until they are golden or light brown on the bottom. Gently lift to check the color.
  16. Holding the lid close to the skillet to lessen the spattering effect of water hitting hot oil, add enough water to come up the side of the buns by 1/4 inch, about 1/4 cup. The water and oil will sputter a bit. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil, placing it very slightly ajar to allow steam to escape, so condensation doesn’t fall on the buns and perhaps cause their collapse. Let the water bubble away until it is mostly gone, about 6 minutes.
  17. When you hear sizzling noises (a sign that most of the water is gone), remove the lid. Let the dumplings fry for about 1 minute, until the bottoms are brown and crisp. At this point, you can serve the buns, crisp bottoms up like pot stickers. Or, you can use chopsticks to flip each bun over (separate any that are sticking together first) and then fry the other side for about 45 seconds, or until golden.
  18. Turn off the heat, wait for the cooking action to cease, and transfer the buns to a serving plate. Display them with a golden side up. Serve with the gingered vinegar, chile oil, and soy sauce. Eat these buns with chopsticks—they’re a little greasy on the fingers.Reheat left overs with some oil and water in a nonstick skillet, as you would a pot sticker.
  19. To make chile oil, put the chile flakes in a dry glass jar.
  20. Attach a deep-fry thermometer to a small saucepan and add the oil. Heat over medium-high heat until smoking hot (the temperature will top 400°F) and remove from the heat. Wait 5 to 7 minutes for the temperature to decrease to 325° to 350°F (drop a chile flake in and it should gently sizzle), and then pour the oil into the glass jar. The chile flakes will sizzle and swirl and then settle down.
  21. Cool completely before covering and storing. Give it a couple days to mature before using. Chile oil keeps for months in the cupboard.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/pan-fried-pork-and-scallion-mini-buns-sheng-jian-baozi-with-chile-oil/

Asian Dumplings

 

Asian Dumplings: Mastering Gyoza, Spring Rolls, Samosas, and More is one of the August selection for the World Spice Cookbook Club. Asian Dumplings: Mastering Gyoza, Spring Rolls, Samosas, and More is currently available for purchase at our retail store.

Reprinted with permission from Asian Dumplings by Andrea Nguyen. Copyright © 2009 Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc. Photography © 2009 by Penny De Los Santos

Categories: Asia, Cookbook Club, Global Cuisines, Recipes, Snacky Bits | Leave a comment

Sassy Short Ribs

We love all things sassy, and these short ribs are no exception. The bold flavor of our Sassy Steak Spice is infused into every bite along with orange marmalade and fresh oregano for an impeccable flavor combination. The great charm in this dish is the layers of flavor developed by adding spices in stages along the way, and finishing with fresh herbs… who says you can’t have it all? The melt-in-your-mouth beef is pretty good too.

sassy short ribs

Sassy Short Ribs

Sassy Short Ribs

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil
  • 3 pounds small bone-in beef short ribs
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons Sassy Steak Spice, divided
  • 3/4 cup orange marmalade
  • 3/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh oregano, divided

Instructions

  1. Add the oil to a heavy, medium skillet, over medium heat. Working in batches- brown the short ribs, about 2 minutes each side. Transfer the seared ribs to a platter or bowl.
  2. Add the chopped onion to the skillet and sauté until soft, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle the Sassy Steak Spice over the onion and cook one minute more. Lower the heat and add the marmalade, cooking just long enough to melt it with the onion. Transfer the mixture to the insert of a 5-6 quart slow cooker, scraping out every tasty bit!
  3. Add the chicken broth, red wine and soy sauce to the cooker and stir to combine. Now nestle the ribs into the sauce and cook on high for 5-6 hours or low for 9 hours, until the meat is fork tender. Don't peek while it is cooking! You want all those luscious flavors to circulate for the whole cooking time.
  4. At the end of the cooking time, transfer the ribs to a serving platter and then strain the sauce into a fat-separator. Remove the strained bits of meat and onion to top the ribs on the serving platter and, after the fat has separated, pour the de-fatted sauce into a medium saucepan.
  5. Add the remaining teaspoon of Sassy Steak Spice and simmer the sauce 4-6 minutes to reduce and concentrate the flavors. Add 1 teaspoon of the oregano and cook 1 minute more.
  6. Pour the sauce over the ribs and garnish with the remaining teaspoon of oregano.
  7. Serve with brown or white rice, and lightly sautéed chard and/or bok choy.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/sassy-short-ribs/

Tip: For those of you with slow cooker inserts that are stovetop safe, go ahead and use it in place of the skillet to start the sauce and save a dish!

sassy steak spice

 

Categories: Asia, Course, Global Cuisines, Latin America, Main Meals, Recipes, Slow Cooker | Leave a comment

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Many foods convey a sense of place. Unless you are lucky enough to be in China, there’s no doubt that Chinese food tastes best delivered on a stormy night in the 212 area code. But for those of us outside the delivery area, there has to be an alternative and this is it – Take-Out/Fake-Out: Lemon Chicken.

Lemon Chicken

While it may not be as easy as dialing up the Chelsea Big Wok, this juicy crockpot lemon chicken is the next best thing. Set it and forget it, and at the end of the day just stir fry your favorite vegetables to serve alongside and enjoy. We have tried many spice blends in this dish and they are ALL fantastic, so whether you are in the mood for a little Thai Seasoning or Indonesian Ayam, take your pick, it is hard to go wrong with lemon chicken.

lemon_chicken_2

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Take Out-Fake Out: Lemon Chicken

Ingredients

  • 2-3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/4 cup, plus 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Thai Seasoning, divided
  • 1 teaspoon Rooster Spice (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • Lemon wedges, Gomasio and sliced scallions for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Rinse the chicken thighs well, and pat dry.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together the chicken broth, sliced onion, soy sauce, honey, 1/4 cup lemon juice, rice wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon Thai Seasoning and 1 teaspoon Rooster Spice. Stir the sauce well to combine, and pour it into a 5-6 quart crock pot.
  3. Nestle the chicken pieces in the sauce and cook on low for 4-5 hours, until the chicken easily pulls apart with a fork.
  4. Using a slotted spoon, remove the chicken from the crock pot and set aside. Adjust the crockpot to high heat.
  5. In a small measuring cup, mix together the arrowroot and cold water to make a slurry. Add the slurry to the sauce in the crockpot, then add the sesame oil, 1 additional teaspoon Thai Seasoning and remaining 2 tablespoons of lemon juice. Allow the sauce to simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened.
  6. Adjust the heat setting to warm or low, and return the chicken to the crockpot and gently shred the pieces before serving.
  7. Serve with rice and vegetables, and garnish with a lemon wedge, Gomasio and sliced scallions. Some folks like an extra sprinkle of Rooster Spice as well.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/take-fake-lemon-chicken/

gomasio

Categories: Asia, Course, Global Cuisines, Main Meals, Recipes, Slow Cooker, Take-Out/Fake-Out | Leave a comment

Rooster Grilled Artichokes with Spicy Garlic Mayonaise

Seattle’s local farmers have been showcasing artichokes for a few weeks now, so what better produce to highlight one of our newest blends, Rooster Spice! Inspired by everyone’s favorite Vietnamese hot sauce, Rooster Spice packs a wallop of heat, but boasts a delicious complexity that will keep you coming back.  It’s the perfect accompaniment to these artichokes, or really anything else your market basket can throw at it.

Grilled Artichokes with Rooster Spice

 

Rooster Grilled Artichokes with Spicy Garlic Mayonaise

Rooster Grilled Artichokes with Spicy Garlic Mayonaise

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Fill a Dutch oven with water, add the juice of 1 lemon and the bay leaf.
  2. Trim leaves from the top of artichoke, remove outer layers of leaves from the stem end and snip all remaining spiky tips from the outer leaves. Trim an inch off the bottom of the stem and use a vegetable peeler to remove the fibrous outer layer.
  3. As each artichoke is prepared in this way, drop it into the lemon water to prevent from turning brown.
  4. When artichokes are prepared, cover the pan and bring to a boil. Boil until the base of the stem can be pierced with a fork, about 12-15 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and let stand until cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, combine garlic, lemon juice, and Rooster Spice with the mayonnaise. Mix well. Transfer to a serving dish and chill until needed.
  6. Preheat grill to medium.
  7. Slice the artichoke in half lengthwise. Scoop out the choke and first few inner layers in the center until the bottom is revealed. Brush each half with olive oil and sprinkle with Murray River Flake Salt and Rooster Spice.
  8. Grill the artichokes until tender and lightly charred, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a serving platter, squeeze half a lemon over them and garnish with remaining lemon wedges.
  9. Serve warm, at room temperature or chilled alongside Spicy Garlic Mayonnaise.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/rooster-grilled-artichokes-with-spicy-garlic-mayonaise/

Categories: Asia, BBQ, Course, Global Cuisines, Grilling Season, Recipes, Sides, Snacky Bits | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Continental Curry Biryani

It’s almost Buddha’s birthday! Buddha’s birthday is celebrated on the eighth day of the fourth month of the Chinese lunar calendar in nearly all east-Asian countries, and this year it falls on Friday May 17th in the Western calendar. Because it is customary to eat rice on Buddha’s birthday, we developed this heavily spiced vegetarian biryani to honor the Buddha and many of the exotic lands from which our spices come. Our Continental Curry is the perfect blend for this occasion, as it combines the best elements of several varieties of yellow curry. While we can’t promise a permanent Nirvana as a result of this dish, we guarantee at least a transient one!

Continental Curry Biryani

 

Continental Curry Biryani

Continental Curry Biryani

Ingredients

    For the Rice
  • 1 cup basmati rice, well rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 big pinch of saffron
  • 2 tablespoons golden raisins
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cashews
  • 1/4 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole cumin seed
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole Indian coriander seed
  • 3 whole green cardamom pods
  • 2 Indonesia cassia sticks
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon Murray River flake salt
  • For the Curry Paste
  • 6 large cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 inch piece of ginger, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons ground Continental Curry
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 7 mint leaves
  • 1 jalapeno, chopped
  • 2 roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon Murray River flake salt
  • 1 tablesoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup broccoli florets
  • 1/2 cup cauliflower florets
  • 1/2 cup green beans, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1/2 cup peas
  • 1 medium sweet potato, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1/2 cup water
  • For Baking the Biryani
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup warm milk
  • 1 pinch saffron
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons cashews, chopped
  • Pan spray
  • Greek yogurt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. For the Rice
  3. In a medium-sized pan over medium heat, add the oil. When hot, add the onion and cook until softened. Add raisins, cashews, cloves, cumin, Indian coriander, green cardamom and cassia sticks and saute until fragrant and the seeds start to "pop", about 3 minutes.
  4. Add salt, water and saffron and bring to a boil. Add rice and turn heat down to simmer. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes. Rice will be 3/4 of the way cooked. Spread in a shallow pan to cool.
  5. While rice is cooking, par-cook the vegetables. In a shallow pan over medium-high heat, add the vegetables and water. Cover and steam for about 5 minutes.
  6. For the Paste
  7. In a food processor, puree the garlic, ginger, onions, mint leaves, Continental Curry, jalapeno, salt and tomato.
  8. In a medium saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Add puree and saute for 5 minutes. Add par cooked vegetables, stirring well to combine. Taste for seasoning and salt.
  9. To Bake the Biryani
  10. In a small saucepan, warm a pinch of saffron and the milk. Remove from heat.
  11. Spray a large ovenproof casserole dish with pan spray. Layer in half of the rice and sprinkle with half of the cilantro. Evenly spread the vegetable curry paste mixture over the rice, top with remaining rice, and sprinkle with remainder of cilantro.
  12. Drizzle with the saffron-infused milk, cover the casserole dish and bake for 15 minutes, until the rice is cooked through. Turn the oven off and let the biryani stay in the hot oven for another 10 minutes.
  13. While the biryani is baking, heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat.
  14. Add the sliced onions and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels. Next, add chopped cashews and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels.
  15. Remove the biryani for the oven. Top with fried onions and cashews and serve with Greek yogurt on the side.
https://www.silkroaddiary.com/continental-spice-biriyani/

Categories: Asia, Course, Curries & Masalas, Global Cuisines, Holiday, Indian Subcontinent, Main Meals, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment